Paved with good intentions: Do public health and human service providers contribute to racial/ethnic disparities in health?

Michelle van Ryn, Steven S. Fu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

372 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is extensive evidence of racial/ethnic disparities in receipt of health care. The potential contribution of provider behavior to such disparities has remained largely unexplored. Do health and human service providers behave in ways that contribute to systematic inequities in care and outcomes? If so, why does this occur? The authors build on existing evidence to provide an integrated, coherent, and sound approach to research on providers' contributions to racial/ ethnic disparities. They review the evidence regarding provider contributions to disparities in outcomes and describe a causal model representing an integrated set of hypothesized mechanisms through which health care providers' behaviors may contribute to these disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-255
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume93
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

United States Public Health Service
Health
Health Personnel
Health Services
Delivery of Health Care
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Paved with good intentions : Do public health and human service providers contribute to racial/ethnic disparities in health? / van Ryn, Michelle; Fu, Steven S.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 93, No. 2, 01.02.2003, p. 248-255.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{1550de25cd214f5191558a0b44689952,
title = "Paved with good intentions: Do public health and human service providers contribute to racial/ethnic disparities in health?",
abstract = "There is extensive evidence of racial/ethnic disparities in receipt of health care. The potential contribution of provider behavior to such disparities has remained largely unexplored. Do health and human service providers behave in ways that contribute to systematic inequities in care and outcomes? If so, why does this occur? The authors build on existing evidence to provide an integrated, coherent, and sound approach to research on providers' contributions to racial/ ethnic disparities. They review the evidence regarding provider contributions to disparities in outcomes and describe a causal model representing an integrated set of hypothesized mechanisms through which health care providers' behaviors may contribute to these disparities.",
author = "{van Ryn}, Michelle and Fu, {Steven S.}",
year = "2003",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2105/AJPH.93.2.248",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "93",
pages = "248--255",
journal = "American Journal of Public Health",
issn = "0090-0036",
publisher = "American Public Health Association Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Paved with good intentions

T2 - Do public health and human service providers contribute to racial/ethnic disparities in health?

AU - van Ryn, Michelle

AU - Fu, Steven S.

PY - 2003/2/1

Y1 - 2003/2/1

N2 - There is extensive evidence of racial/ethnic disparities in receipt of health care. The potential contribution of provider behavior to such disparities has remained largely unexplored. Do health and human service providers behave in ways that contribute to systematic inequities in care and outcomes? If so, why does this occur? The authors build on existing evidence to provide an integrated, coherent, and sound approach to research on providers' contributions to racial/ ethnic disparities. They review the evidence regarding provider contributions to disparities in outcomes and describe a causal model representing an integrated set of hypothesized mechanisms through which health care providers' behaviors may contribute to these disparities.

AB - There is extensive evidence of racial/ethnic disparities in receipt of health care. The potential contribution of provider behavior to such disparities has remained largely unexplored. Do health and human service providers behave in ways that contribute to systematic inequities in care and outcomes? If so, why does this occur? The authors build on existing evidence to provide an integrated, coherent, and sound approach to research on providers' contributions to racial/ ethnic disparities. They review the evidence regarding provider contributions to disparities in outcomes and describe a causal model representing an integrated set of hypothesized mechanisms through which health care providers' behaviors may contribute to these disparities.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037309935&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037309935&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2105/AJPH.93.2.248

DO - 10.2105/AJPH.93.2.248

M3 - Review article

C2 - 12554578

AN - SCOPUS:0037309935

VL - 93

SP - 248

EP - 255

JO - American Journal of Public Health

JF - American Journal of Public Health

SN - 0090-0036

IS - 2

ER -