Patterning Axonal Guidance Molecules Using a Novel Strategy for Microcontact Printing

Anthony A. Oliva, Conrad D. James, Caroline E. Kingman, Harold G. Craighead, Gary Banker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

133 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present here a two-step strategy for micropatterning proteins on a substrate to control neurite growth in culture. First, conventional microcontact printing is used to prepare a micropattern of protein A, which binds the Fc fragment of immunoglobulins. Then, a chimeric protein, consisting of the extracellular domain of a guidance protein recombinantly linked to the Fc fragment of IgG (prepared using conventional molecular techniques), is applied from solution. The chimeric protein binds to the patterned protein A, taking on its geometric pattern. Using this method, we have micropatterned the extracellular domain of the cell adhesion molecule, L1 (as an L1-Fc chimera) and demonstrated that it retains its ability to selectively guide axonal growth. L1-Fc micropatterned on a background of poly-L-lysine resulted in selective growth of the axons on the micropattern, whereas the somata and dendrites were unresponsive. Substrates bearing simultaneous micropatterns of L1-Fc and poly-L-lysine on a background of untreated glass were also created. Using this approach, cell body position was controlled by manipulating the dimensions of the poly-L-lysine pattern, and the dendrites were constrained to the poly-L-lysine pattern, while the axons grew preferentially on L1-Fc. The two-step microcontact printing method allows preparation of substrates that contain guidance proteins in geometric patterns with resolution of ∼1 μm. This method should be broadly applicable to many classes of proteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1639-1648
Number of pages10
JournalNeurochemical Research
Volume28
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2003

Fingerprint

Printing
Lysine
Molecules
Immunoglobulin Fc Fragments
Proteins
Staphylococcal Protein A
Dendrites
Axons
Bearings (structural)
Substrates
Growth
Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule L1
Carisoprodol
Neurites
Glass
Immunoglobulin G
Cells

Keywords

  • Axon
  • CAM
  • Cell adhesion molecule
  • Guidance
  • L1
  • Lithography
  • Microcontact printing
  • Micropatterning
  • Photolithography
  • Poly-L-lysine
  • Polylysine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Oliva, A. A., James, C. D., Kingman, C. E., Craighead, H. G., & Banker, G. (2003). Patterning Axonal Guidance Molecules Using a Novel Strategy for Microcontact Printing. Neurochemical Research, 28(11), 1639-1648. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1026052820129

Patterning Axonal Guidance Molecules Using a Novel Strategy for Microcontact Printing. / Oliva, Anthony A.; James, Conrad D.; Kingman, Caroline E.; Craighead, Harold G.; Banker, Gary.

In: Neurochemical Research, Vol. 28, No. 11, 11.2003, p. 1639-1648.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oliva, AA, James, CD, Kingman, CE, Craighead, HG & Banker, G 2003, 'Patterning Axonal Guidance Molecules Using a Novel Strategy for Microcontact Printing', Neurochemical Research, vol. 28, no. 11, pp. 1639-1648. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1026052820129
Oliva, Anthony A. ; James, Conrad D. ; Kingman, Caroline E. ; Craighead, Harold G. ; Banker, Gary. / Patterning Axonal Guidance Molecules Using a Novel Strategy for Microcontact Printing. In: Neurochemical Research. 2003 ; Vol. 28, No. 11. pp. 1639-1648.
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