Patient-reported measures of hearing loss and tinnitus in pediatric cancer and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

A systematic review

Daniel Stark, Abby R. Rosenberg, Donna Johnston, Kristin Knight, Lizzie Caperon, Elizabeth Uleryk, A. Lindsay Frazier, Lillian Sung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We identified studies that described use of any patient-reported outcome scale for hearing loss or tinnitus among children and adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. Method: In this systematic review, we performed electronic searches of OvidSP MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO to August 2015. We included studies if they used any patient-reported scale of hearing loss or tinnitus among children and AYAs with cancer or HSCT recipients. Only English language publications were included. Two reviewers identified studies and abstracted data. Results: There were 953 studies screened; 6 met eligibility criteria. All studies administered hearing patient-reported outcomes only once, after therapy completion. None of the studies described the psychometric properties of the hearing-specific component. Three instruments (among 6 studies) were used: Health Utilities Index (Barr et al., 2000; Fu et al., 2006; Kennedy et al., 2014), Hearing Measurement Scales (Einar-Jon et al., 2011; Einarsson et al., 2011), and the Tinnitus Questionnaire for Auditory Brainstem Implant (Soussi & Otto, 1994). All had limitations, precluding routine use for hearing assessment in this population. Conclusions: We identified few studies that included hearing patient-reported measures for children and AYA cancer and HSCT patients. None are ideal to take forward into future studies. Future work should focus on the creation of a new psychometrically sound instrument for hearing outcomes in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1247-1252
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume59
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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Neoplastic Stem Cells
Tinnitus
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Hearing Loss
Hearing
young adult
cancer
Pediatrics
adolescent
recipient
Young Adult
psychometrics
English language
Auditory Brain Stem Implants
electronics
Adult Stem Cells
questionnaire
health
Psychometrics
MEDLINE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Patient-reported measures of hearing loss and tinnitus in pediatric cancer and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation : A systematic review. / Stark, Daniel; Rosenberg, Abby R.; Johnston, Donna; Knight, Kristin; Caperon, Lizzie; Uleryk, Elizabeth; Frazier, A. Lindsay; Sung, Lillian.

In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Vol. 59, No. 5, 01.10.2016, p. 1247-1252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stark, Daniel ; Rosenberg, Abby R. ; Johnston, Donna ; Knight, Kristin ; Caperon, Lizzie ; Uleryk, Elizabeth ; Frazier, A. Lindsay ; Sung, Lillian. / Patient-reported measures of hearing loss and tinnitus in pediatric cancer and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation : A systematic review. In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. 2016 ; Vol. 59, No. 5. pp. 1247-1252.
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