Parents' daily time with their children: A workplace intervention

Kelly D. Davis, Katie M. Lawson, David M. Almeida, Erin L. Kelly, Rosalind B. King, Leslie Hammer, Lynne M. Casper, Cassandra A. Okechukwu, Ginger Hanson, Susan M. McHale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: In the context of a group randomized field trial, we evaluated whether parents who participated in a workplace intervention, designed to increase supervisor support for personal and family life and schedule control, reported significantly more daily time with their children at the 12-month follow-up compared with parents assigned to the Usual Practice group. We also tested whether the intervention effect was moderated by parent gender, child gender, or child age. METHODS: The Support-Transform-Achieve-Results Intervention was delivered in an information technology division of a US Fortune 500 company. Participants included 93 parents (45% mothers) of a randomly selected focal child aged 9 to 17 years (49% daughters) who completed daily telephone diaries at baseline and 12 months after intervention. During evening telephone calls on 8 consecutive days, parents reported how much time they spent with their child that day. RESULTS: Parents in the intervention group exhibited a significant increase in parent-child shared time, 39 minutes per day on average, between baseline and the 12-month follow-up. By contrast, parents in the Usual Practice group averaged 24 fewer minutes with their child per day at the 12-month follow-up. Intervention effects were evident for mothers but not for fathers and for daughters but not sons. CONCLUSIONS: The hypothesis that the intervention would improve parents' daily time with their children was supported. Future studies should examine how redesigning work can change the quality of parent-child interactions and activities known to be important for youth health and development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)875-882
Number of pages8
JournalPediatrics
Volume135
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Workplace
Parents
Nuclear Family
Telephone
Mothers
Fathers
Appointments and Schedules
Technology
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Davis, K. D., Lawson, K. M., Almeida, D. M., Kelly, E. L., King, R. B., Hammer, L., ... McHale, S. M. (2015). Parents' daily time with their children: A workplace intervention. Pediatrics, 135(5), 875-882. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-2057

Parents' daily time with their children : A workplace intervention. / Davis, Kelly D.; Lawson, Katie M.; Almeida, David M.; Kelly, Erin L.; King, Rosalind B.; Hammer, Leslie; Casper, Lynne M.; Okechukwu, Cassandra A.; Hanson, Ginger; McHale, Susan M.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 135, No. 5, 01.05.2015, p. 875-882.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davis, KD, Lawson, KM, Almeida, DM, Kelly, EL, King, RB, Hammer, L, Casper, LM, Okechukwu, CA, Hanson, G & McHale, SM 2015, 'Parents' daily time with their children: A workplace intervention', Pediatrics, vol. 135, no. 5, pp. 875-882. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-2057
Davis KD, Lawson KM, Almeida DM, Kelly EL, King RB, Hammer L et al. Parents' daily time with their children: A workplace intervention. Pediatrics. 2015 May 1;135(5):875-882. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-2057
Davis, Kelly D. ; Lawson, Katie M. ; Almeida, David M. ; Kelly, Erin L. ; King, Rosalind B. ; Hammer, Leslie ; Casper, Lynne M. ; Okechukwu, Cassandra A. ; Hanson, Ginger ; McHale, Susan M. / Parents' daily time with their children : A workplace intervention. In: Pediatrics. 2015 ; Vol. 135, No. 5. pp. 875-882.
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