Parent-teen interactions as predictors of depressive symptoms in adolescents with headache

Amy S. Lewandowski, Tonya M. Palermo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated parent-adolescent conflict, family functioning, and adolescent autonomy as predictors of depressive symptoms in adolescents with primary headache. Frequent headaches during adolescence can have a negative impact on activity levels and psychological functioning. Depression is particularly prevalent in adolescents with headache but little research has examined the role of parent-teen interactions in predicting depressive symptoms. Thirty adolescents diagnosed with migraine or chronic daily headache completed self-report measures of pain intensity, parent-adolescent conflict, family functioning, and depression. Adolescents and their parents also participated in three videotaped interaction tasks, scored by independent raters to assess adolescent autonomy. Regression models revealed that pain intensity, parent-adolescent conflict, and autonomy predicted depressive symptoms. Higher levels of conflict, poorer family functioning and lower levels of autonomy were associated with more depressive symptoms. This study highlights the association between parent-teen interactions and psychological functioning in adolescents with primary headache. Implications for intervention are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-338
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Autonomy
  • Conflict
  • Depression
  • Headache

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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