Outcomes of patients in a low-intensity, short-duration involuntary outpatient commitment program

David Pollack, Bentson McFarland, Jo M. Mahler, Anne E. Kovas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the outcomes of patients in a low-intensity, short-duration involuntary outpatient commitment program. After release from inpatient commitment, one group (N=150) entered an involuntary outpatient commitment program that lasted up to six months; a comparison group (N=140) was released into the community without further involuntary care. After the analysis adjusted for confounding variables, patients who were in the involuntary outpatient commitment program had greater use of follow-up outpatient and residential services and psychotropic medications than patients in the comparison group. No differences were found between the groups in follow-up acute psychiatric hospitalization or arrests. Low-intensity, short-duration involuntary outpatient commitment appears to have a limited, but important, impact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)863-866
Number of pages4
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume56
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005

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program commitment
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Group
commitment
hospitalization
medication
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Ambulatory Care
community
Psychiatry
Inpatients
Hospitalization
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Outcomes of patients in a low-intensity, short-duration involuntary outpatient commitment program. / Pollack, David; McFarland, Bentson; Mahler, Jo M.; Kovas, Anne E.

In: Psychiatric Services, Vol. 56, No. 7, 07.2005, p. 863-866.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pollack, David ; McFarland, Bentson ; Mahler, Jo M. ; Kovas, Anne E. / Outcomes of patients in a low-intensity, short-duration involuntary outpatient commitment program. In: Psychiatric Services. 2005 ; Vol. 56, No. 7. pp. 863-866.
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