Omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids

Partners in prevention

William Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

purpose of review: This review addresses the cardiovascular benefits of the two families of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs): omega-6 and omega-3. The former (and the shorter chain species of the latter) are found in vegetable oils and nuts, whereas the longer chain omega-3 FAs are found in fish oils. Although most clinicians understand that the omega-3 FAs are beneficial, there have been calls in the popular press to reduce the intake of the omega-6 FAs because of presumed proinflammatory and prothrombotic effects. Recent findings: The American Heart Association's Nutrition Committee has published two 'Science Advisories', one in 2002 on omega-3 FAs and a new one on omega-6 FAs. Both considered a wide variety of data regarding their effects on cardiac risk. Summary: The AHA concludes that Americans need to increase their intake of long-chain omega-3 FAs and that they should maintain (and possibly even increase) their intakes of omega-6 FAs. For the omega-3 FAs, a healthy target intake is about 500 mg per day (whether from oily fish or fish oil capsules) and for linoleic acid, approximately 15 g per day (12 g for women and 17 g for men). Achieving healthy intakes of both omega-6 and omega-3 FAs is an important component of the nutritional prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-129
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Omega-6 Fatty Acids
Fish Oils
American Heart Association
Essential Fatty Acids
Nuts
Plant Oils
Linoleic Acid
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Capsules
Coronary Disease
Fishes

Keywords

  • Coronary heart disease
  • Diet
  • Fish oil
  • Nutrition
  • Vegetable oil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids : Partners in prevention. / Harris, William.

In: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, Vol. 13, No. 2, 03.2010, p. 125-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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