Ocular albumin fluorophotometric quantitation of endotoxin-induced vascular permeability

S. W. Cousins, James (Jim) Rosenbaum, R. B. Guss, P. R. Egbert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) is known to alter systemic vascular permeability, but this effect is difficult to monitor and quantitate in vivo. The ocular vessels of the rabbit are particularly sensitive to LPS. Using a slit lamp equipped with a fluorophotometer, we have adapted a method to quantitate endotoxin-induced ocular vascular permeability by measuring the accumulation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated albumin into the anterior chamber of the eye. After intravenous administration of Salmonella typhimurim LPS, the anterior chamber fluorescence and blood fluorescence were measured at intervals of 15 min and 1 h, respectively, over 4 h. In controls, maximal fluorescence in the anterior chamber was 3.1 ± 0.8% of blood fluorescence. Doses of LPS as low as 0.25 μg of LPS per kg tended to produce a higher ratio (68.0 ± 7.1) than a larger dose of 50 μg/kg (30.5 ± 16.6). Permeability changes began within 30 min after LPS, and the rate of dye accumulation varied over time, with maximal leakage usually occurring 90 min after LPS, but occasionally occurring much later. Respeated doses produced tolerance. By conjugating albumin to rhodamine and utilizing a second filter with the slit lamp to measure accumulation of this dye, we demonstrated the persistence of marked permeability during a period when intraocular fluorescein isothiocyanate and albumin levels were relatively constant. This methodology indicates that extremely low doses of LPS induce ocular permeability changes and that neither the time course nor the dose response of this effect is linear. Ocular fluorophotometry is a sensitive, noninvasive technique to study the dynamics and pharmacology of LPS-induced permeability changes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)730-736
Number of pages7
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume36
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

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Capillary Permeability
Endotoxins
Albumins
Permeability
Anterior Chamber
Fluorescence
Fluorescein
Coloring Agents
Fluorophotometry
Rhodamines
Salmonella
Intravenous Administration
Lipopolysaccharides
Pharmacology
Rabbits
isothiocyanic acid
Slit Lamp

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Ocular albumin fluorophotometric quantitation of endotoxin-induced vascular permeability. / Cousins, S. W.; Rosenbaum, James (Jim); Guss, R. B.; Egbert, P. R.

In: Infection and Immunity, Vol. 36, No. 2, 1982, p. 730-736.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cousins, S. W. ; Rosenbaum, James (Jim) ; Guss, R. B. ; Egbert, P. R. / Ocular albumin fluorophotometric quantitation of endotoxin-induced vascular permeability. In: Infection and Immunity. 1982 ; Vol. 36, No. 2. pp. 730-736.
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