Nutrigenomics analysis reveals that copper deficiency and dietary sucrose up-regulate inflammation, fibrosis and lipogenic pathways in a mature rat model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Savannah Tallino, Megan Duffy, Martina Ralle, María Paz Cortés, Mauricio Latorre, Jason L. Burkhead

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) prevalence is increasing worldwide, with the affected US population estimated near 30%. Diet is a recognized risk factor in the NAFLD spectrum, which includes nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis. Low hepatic copper (Cu) was recently linked to clinical NAFLD/NASH severity. Simple sugar consumption including sucrose and fructose is implicated in NAFLD, while consumption of these macronutrients also decreases liver Cu levels. Though dietary sugar and low Cu are implicated in NAFLD, transcript-level responses that connect diet and pathology are not established. We have developed a mature rat model of NAFLD induced by dietary Cu deficiency, human-relevant high sucrose intake (30% w/w) or both factors in combination. Compared to the control diet with adequate Cu and 10% (w/w) sucrose, rats fed either high-sucrose or low-Cu diet had increased hepatic expression of genes involved in inflammation and fibrogenesis, including hepatic stellate cell activation, while the combination of diet factors also increased ATP citrate lyase and fatty acid synthase gene transcription (fold change >2, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)996-1006
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Volume26
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

Fingerprint

Dietary Sucrose
Nutrigenomics
Liver
Rats
Copper
Fibrosis
Up-Regulation
Nutrition
Inflammation
Sucrose
Diet
Genes
ATP Citrate (pro-S)-Lyase
Fatty Acid Synthases
Hepatic Stellate Cells
Pathology
Transcription
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Fructose
Sugars

Keywords

  • Copper
  • Fibrosis
  • Inflammation
  • Liver
  • Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis
  • Steatosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Nutrigenomics analysis reveals that copper deficiency and dietary sucrose up-regulate inflammation, fibrosis and lipogenic pathways in a mature rat model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. / Tallino, Savannah; Duffy, Megan; Ralle, Martina; Cortés, María Paz; Latorre, Mauricio; Burkhead, Jason L.

In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, Vol. 26, No. 10, 01.10.2015, p. 996-1006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) prevalence is increasing worldwide, with the affected US population estimated near 30{\%}. Diet is a recognized risk factor in the NAFLD spectrum, which includes nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis. Low hepatic copper (Cu) was recently linked to clinical NAFLD/NASH severity. Simple sugar consumption including sucrose and fructose is implicated in NAFLD, while consumption of these macronutrients also decreases liver Cu levels. Though dietary sugar and low Cu are implicated in NAFLD, transcript-level responses that connect diet and pathology are not established. We have developed a mature rat model of NAFLD induced by dietary Cu deficiency, human-relevant high sucrose intake (30{\%} w/w) or both factors in combination. Compared to the control diet with adequate Cu and 10{\%} (w/w) sucrose, rats fed either high-sucrose or low-Cu diet had increased hepatic expression of genes involved in inflammation and fibrogenesis, including hepatic stellate cell activation, while the combination of diet factors also increased ATP citrate lyase and fatty acid synthase gene transcription (fold change >2, P",
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