Noninvasive localization of arterial occlusive disease: A comparison of segmental Doppler pressures and arterial duplex mapping

Gregory (Greg) Moneta, Richard A. Yeager, Raymond W. Lee, John M. Porter

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    65 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the abilities of arterial duplex mapping and segmental Doppler pressures to noninvasively localize hemodynamically significant lower extremity arterial occlusive disease. Methods: After angiographic controls were instituted, arterial duplex mapping and segmental Doppler pressures were blindly compared for their ability to localize a high-grade (50% to 100%) stenosis to the iliac or common femoral arteries, the superficial femoral artery, or the popliteal artery in 151 lower extremities from 79 patients. Results: Rates of sensitivity and specificity of arterial duplex mapping for identifying a high-grade stenosis at the three arterial levels were 88% and 97%, 95% and 100%, and 78% and 99%, respectively. Those for segmental Doppler pressures were 59% and 86%, 73% and 80%, and 48% and 53%, respectively. There was complete agreement between arterial duplex mapping and angiography in 82% of the limbs studied and between segmental pressures and angiography in 34% of the limbs (p <0.0001). The presence of diabetes, kidney failure, or previous vascular surgery in the limb studied did not affect the accuracy of either test. Conclusion: Arterial duplex mapping is far superior to segmental Doppler pressures for localization of high-grade angiographic lesions from the iliac to the popliteal arteries.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)578-582
    Number of pages5
    JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
    Volume17
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1993

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    Arterial Occlusive Diseases
    Arterial Pressure
    Pressure
    Popliteal Artery
    Extremities
    Femoral Artery
    Lower Extremity
    Angiography
    Pathologic Constriction
    Renal Insufficiency
    Blood Vessels
    Sensitivity and Specificity

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
    • Surgery

    Cite this

    Noninvasive localization of arterial occlusive disease : A comparison of segmental Doppler pressures and arterial duplex mapping. / Moneta, Gregory (Greg); Yeager, Richard A.; Lee, Raymond W.; Porter, John M.

    In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 17, No. 3, 1993, p. 578-582.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the abilities of arterial duplex mapping and segmental Doppler pressures to noninvasively localize hemodynamically significant lower extremity arterial occlusive disease. Methods: After angiographic controls were instituted, arterial duplex mapping and segmental Doppler pressures were blindly compared for their ability to localize a high-grade (50{\%} to 100{\%}) stenosis to the iliac or common femoral arteries, the superficial femoral artery, or the popliteal artery in 151 lower extremities from 79 patients. Results: Rates of sensitivity and specificity of arterial duplex mapping for identifying a high-grade stenosis at the three arterial levels were 88{\%} and 97{\%}, 95{\%} and 100{\%}, and 78{\%} and 99{\%}, respectively. Those for segmental Doppler pressures were 59{\%} and 86{\%}, 73{\%} and 80{\%}, and 48{\%} and 53{\%}, respectively. There was complete agreement between arterial duplex mapping and angiography in 82{\%} of the limbs studied and between segmental pressures and angiography in 34{\%} of the limbs (p <0.0001). The presence of diabetes, kidney failure, or previous vascular surgery in the limb studied did not affect the accuracy of either test. Conclusion: Arterial duplex mapping is far superior to segmental Doppler pressures for localization of high-grade angiographic lesions from the iliac to the popliteal arteries.",
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    AU - Porter, John M.

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