Neuroimmune basis of methamphetamine toxicity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although it is not known which antigen-specific immune responses (or if antigen-specific immune responses) are relevant or required for methamphetamine's neurotoxic effects, it is apparent that methamphetamine exposure is associated with significant effects on adaptive and innate immunity. Alterations in lymphocyte activity and number, changes in cytokine signaling, impairments in phagocytic functions, and glial activation and gliosis have all been reported. These drug-induced changes in immune response, particularly within the CNS, are now thought to play a critical role in the addiction process for methamphetamine dependence as well as for other substance use disorders. In Section 2, methamphetamine's effects on glial cell (e.g., microglia and astrocytes) activity and inflammatory signaling cascades are summarized, including how alterations in immune cell function can induce the neurotoxic and addictive effects of methamphetamine. Section 2 also describes neurotransmitter involvement in the modulation of methamphetamine's inflammatory effects. Section 3 discusses the very recent use of pharmacological and genetic animal models which have helped elucidate the behavioral effects of methamphetamine's neurotoxic effects and the role of the immune system. Section 4 is focused on the effects of methamphetamine on blood-brain barrier integrity and associated immune consequences. Clinical considerations such as the combined effects of methamphetamine and HIV and/or HCV on brain structure and function are included in Section 4. Finally, in Section 5, immune-based treatment strategies are reviewed, with a focus on vaccine development, neuroimmune therapies, and other anti-inflammatory approaches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-197
Number of pages33
JournalInternational Review of Neurobiology
Volume118
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Methamphetamine
Neuroglia
Gliosis
Genetic Models
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II
Lymphocyte Count
Microglia
Adaptive Immunity
Blood-Brain Barrier
Innate Immunity
Astrocytes
Substance-Related Disorders
Neurotransmitter Agents
Immune System
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Vaccines
Animal Models
HIV
Pharmacology
Cytokines

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • Blood-brain barrier
  • Chemokine
  • Cytokine
  • Immunity
  • Methamphetamine
  • Neuroinflammation
  • Psychostimulants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Neuroimmune basis of methamphetamine toxicity. / Loftis, Jennifer; Janowsky, Aaron.

In: International Review of Neurobiology, Vol. 118, 2014, p. 165-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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