MULTIMODAL IMAGING of TWO UNCONVENTIONAL CASES of BARTONELLA NEURORETINITIS

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2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To report two cases of cat-scratch fever with atypical posterior segment manifestations. Methods: Two cases were retrospectively reviewed. Results: A 27-year-old woman presented with painless blurring of central vision in her left eye. Clinical examination revealed a small focal area of retinitis within the macula associated with a subtle macular star. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography showed a hyperreflective inner retinal lesion in addition to subretinal and intraretinal fluid as well as hyperreflective foci within the outer plexiform layer. Serology was positive for anti-B. henselae IgM (titer 1:32). A 34-year-old woman presented with painless loss of vision in both eyes associated with headaches and pain with extraocular movement. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography depicted subretinal fluid, intraretinal fluid, and hyperreflective deposits within the outer plexiform layer. A focal collection of vitreous cell was observed overlying the optic nerve in the left eye. Bilateral disk leakage was identified on fluorescein angiography. Serology revealed high-titer anti-B. henselae antibodies (IgM titers 1:32, IgG titers 1:256). Conclusion: Our cases highlight the necessity of recognizing more unusual posterior segment presentations of ocular bartonellosis. Multimodal retinal imaging including spectral-domain optical coherence tomography may help better characterize lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-43
Number of pages4
JournalRetinal Cases and Brief Reports
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bartonella henselae
  • Catscratch disease
  • Neuroretinitis
  • Optical coherence tomography
  • Retinal imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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