Motivational changes that develop in a mouse model of inflammation-induced depression are independent of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase

Elisabeth G. Vichaya, Geoffroy Laumet, Diana L. Christian, Aaron J. Grossberg, Darlene J. Estrada, Cobi J. Heijnen, Annemieke Kavelaars, Robert Dantzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite years of research, our understanding of the mechanisms by which inflammation induces depression is still limited. As clinical data points to a strong association between depression and motivational alterations, we sought to (1) characterize the motivational changes that are associated with inflammation in mice, and (2) determine if they depend on inflammation-induced activation of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase-1 (IDO1). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated or spared nerve injured (SNI) wild type (WT) and Ido1−/− mice underwent behavioral tests of antidepressant activity (e.g., forced swim test) and motivated behavior, including assessment of (1) reward expectancy using a food-related anticipatory activity task, (2) willingness to work for reward using a progressive ratio schedule of food reinforcement, (3) effort allocation using a concurrent choice task, and (4) ability to associate environmental cues with reward using conditioned place preference. LPS- and SNI-induced deficits in behavioral tests of antidepressant activity in WT but not Ido1−/− mice. Further, LPS decreased food related-anticipatory activity, reduced performance in the progressive ratio task, and shifted effort toward the preferred reward in the concurrent choice task. These effects were observed in both WT and Ido1−/− mice. Finally, SNI mice developed a conditioned place preference based on relief from pain in an IDO1-independent manner. These findings demonstrate that the motivational effects of inflammation do not require IDO1. Further, they indicate that the motivational component of inflammation-induced depression is mechanistically distinct from that measured by behavioral tests of antidepressant activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)364-371
Number of pages8
JournalNeuropsychopharmacology
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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