Microfluidic vortex technology for pure circulating tumor cell concentration from patient blood

J. Che, E. Sollier, D. E. Go, N. Kummer, M. Rettig, J. Goldman, N. Nickols, S. McCloskey, R. P. Kulkarni, Dino Di Carlo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from blood is important for determining cancer prognosis, characterizing genetic mutations for targeted drug therapies, and studying the biological mechanisms of metastasis. Here, we combine microfluidic inertial focusing and vortices to extract and enrich large CTCs from a significant background of smaller leukocytes. The size-based, clog-less technique operates at a high throughput (20 min for 7.5 mL of blood) and delivers a concentrated sample (300 μL volume) of cells at high purity (57-94%) and viability (85.7%). We demonstrate successful CTC extraction from stage IV cancer patients with breast (N=4) and lung (N=8) cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication17th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2013
PublisherChemical and Biological Microsystems Society
Pages1018-1020
Number of pages3
ISBN (Print)9781632666246
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes
Event17th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2013 - Freiburg, Germany
Duration: Oct 27 2013Oct 31 2013

Publication series

Name17th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2013
Volume2

Conference

Conference17th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2013
CountryGermany
CityFreiburg
Period10/27/1310/31/13

Keywords

  • Cancer cell trapping
  • Circulating tumor cells
  • Inertial microfluidics
  • Rare cell enrichment
  • Vortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering

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