Methamphetamine-related psychiatric visits to an urban academic emergency department: An observational study

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Abstract

Background: Methamphetamine, a stimulant of abuse, is associated with a significant number of Emergency Department (ED) visits. Methamphetamine use may produce psychiatric symptoms including acute psychosis, depression, and anxiety disorders. Study Objectives: To characterize psychiatric emergencies either directly or indirectly attributable to methamphetamine use in an urban academic ED. Methods: We analyzed a database of patients determined to have an ED visit that was either methamphetamine related or non-methamphetamine related. We retrospectively reviewed the records of the subset of ED visits from this database with psychiatric diagnoses. We compared the characteristics of patients with methamphetamine-related psychiatric visits (MRPVs) and non-methamphetamine-related psychiatric visits (non-MRPVs). Results: We identified 130 patients with MRPVs. This represented 7.6% (130 of 1709) of all psychiatric visits. Patients with MRPV, compared to non-MRPV patients, were younger (34.4 years vs. 39.1 years, respectively, p = 0.0005), more likely to be uninsured (55% vs. 37%, respectively, p = 0.001), and less likely to have a past history of depression (10% vs. 19%, respectively, p = 0.011). Many characteristics between the two groups (MRPV vs. non-MRPV) were similar: likelihood of patient being placed on a psychiatric hold; hospital charges; previous histories of psychiatric visits; and history of anxiety, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia. Conclusions: Methamphetamine may be related to a significant proportion (7.6%) of psychiatric ED visits. Furthermore, patients with methamphetamine-associated psychiatric visits are younger, have lower rates of depression, are more likely to be uninsured, and are less likely to have a substance abuse-related chief complaint than patients with non-methamphetamine- associated ED psychiatric visits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)136-142
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Emergency Medicine
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Methamphetamine
Observational Studies
Psychiatry
Hospital Emergency Service
Depression
Anxiety Disorders
Databases
Hospital Charges
Bipolar Disorder
Mental Disorders
Psychotic Disorders
Substance-Related Disorders

Keywords

  • Emergency department
  • Methamphetamine
  • Psychiatric
  • Substance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{7f55d93657ca4481a1b31a6dd94a4b89,
title = "Methamphetamine-related psychiatric visits to an urban academic emergency department: An observational study",
abstract = "Background: Methamphetamine, a stimulant of abuse, is associated with a significant number of Emergency Department (ED) visits. Methamphetamine use may produce psychiatric symptoms including acute psychosis, depression, and anxiety disorders. Study Objectives: To characterize psychiatric emergencies either directly or indirectly attributable to methamphetamine use in an urban academic ED. Methods: We analyzed a database of patients determined to have an ED visit that was either methamphetamine related or non-methamphetamine related. We retrospectively reviewed the records of the subset of ED visits from this database with psychiatric diagnoses. We compared the characteristics of patients with methamphetamine-related psychiatric visits (MRPVs) and non-methamphetamine-related psychiatric visits (non-MRPVs). Results: We identified 130 patients with MRPVs. This represented 7.6{\%} (130 of 1709) of all psychiatric visits. Patients with MRPV, compared to non-MRPV patients, were younger (34.4 years vs. 39.1 years, respectively, p = 0.0005), more likely to be uninsured (55{\%} vs. 37{\%}, respectively, p = 0.001), and less likely to have a past history of depression (10{\%} vs. 19{\%}, respectively, p = 0.011). Many characteristics between the two groups (MRPV vs. non-MRPV) were similar: likelihood of patient being placed on a psychiatric hold; hospital charges; previous histories of psychiatric visits; and history of anxiety, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia. Conclusions: Methamphetamine may be related to a significant proportion (7.6{\%}) of psychiatric ED visits. Furthermore, patients with methamphetamine-associated psychiatric visits are younger, have lower rates of depression, are more likely to be uninsured, and are less likely to have a substance abuse-related chief complaint than patients with non-methamphetamine- associated ED psychiatric visits.",
keywords = "Emergency department, Methamphetamine, Psychiatric, Substance abuse",
author = "Robert Cloutier and Robert Hendrickson and Fu, {Rongwei (Rochelle)} and Brian Blake",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1016/j.jemermed.2012.11.094",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "45",
pages = "136--142",
journal = "Journal of Emergency Medicine",
issn = "0736-4679",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "1",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Methamphetamine-related psychiatric visits to an urban academic emergency department

T2 - An observational study

AU - Cloutier, Robert

AU - Hendrickson, Robert

AU - Fu, Rongwei (Rochelle)

AU - Blake, Brian

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Background: Methamphetamine, a stimulant of abuse, is associated with a significant number of Emergency Department (ED) visits. Methamphetamine use may produce psychiatric symptoms including acute psychosis, depression, and anxiety disorders. Study Objectives: To characterize psychiatric emergencies either directly or indirectly attributable to methamphetamine use in an urban academic ED. Methods: We analyzed a database of patients determined to have an ED visit that was either methamphetamine related or non-methamphetamine related. We retrospectively reviewed the records of the subset of ED visits from this database with psychiatric diagnoses. We compared the characteristics of patients with methamphetamine-related psychiatric visits (MRPVs) and non-methamphetamine-related psychiatric visits (non-MRPVs). Results: We identified 130 patients with MRPVs. This represented 7.6% (130 of 1709) of all psychiatric visits. Patients with MRPV, compared to non-MRPV patients, were younger (34.4 years vs. 39.1 years, respectively, p = 0.0005), more likely to be uninsured (55% vs. 37%, respectively, p = 0.001), and less likely to have a past history of depression (10% vs. 19%, respectively, p = 0.011). Many characteristics between the two groups (MRPV vs. non-MRPV) were similar: likelihood of patient being placed on a psychiatric hold; hospital charges; previous histories of psychiatric visits; and history of anxiety, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia. Conclusions: Methamphetamine may be related to a significant proportion (7.6%) of psychiatric ED visits. Furthermore, patients with methamphetamine-associated psychiatric visits are younger, have lower rates of depression, are more likely to be uninsured, and are less likely to have a substance abuse-related chief complaint than patients with non-methamphetamine- associated ED psychiatric visits.

AB - Background: Methamphetamine, a stimulant of abuse, is associated with a significant number of Emergency Department (ED) visits. Methamphetamine use may produce psychiatric symptoms including acute psychosis, depression, and anxiety disorders. Study Objectives: To characterize psychiatric emergencies either directly or indirectly attributable to methamphetamine use in an urban academic ED. Methods: We analyzed a database of patients determined to have an ED visit that was either methamphetamine related or non-methamphetamine related. We retrospectively reviewed the records of the subset of ED visits from this database with psychiatric diagnoses. We compared the characteristics of patients with methamphetamine-related psychiatric visits (MRPVs) and non-methamphetamine-related psychiatric visits (non-MRPVs). Results: We identified 130 patients with MRPVs. This represented 7.6% (130 of 1709) of all psychiatric visits. Patients with MRPV, compared to non-MRPV patients, were younger (34.4 years vs. 39.1 years, respectively, p = 0.0005), more likely to be uninsured (55% vs. 37%, respectively, p = 0.001), and less likely to have a past history of depression (10% vs. 19%, respectively, p = 0.011). Many characteristics between the two groups (MRPV vs. non-MRPV) were similar: likelihood of patient being placed on a psychiatric hold; hospital charges; previous histories of psychiatric visits; and history of anxiety, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia. Conclusions: Methamphetamine may be related to a significant proportion (7.6%) of psychiatric ED visits. Furthermore, patients with methamphetamine-associated psychiatric visits are younger, have lower rates of depression, are more likely to be uninsured, and are less likely to have a substance abuse-related chief complaint than patients with non-methamphetamine- associated ED psychiatric visits.

KW - Emergency department

KW - Methamphetamine

KW - Psychiatric

KW - Substance abuse

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jemermed.2012.11.094

DO - 10.1016/j.jemermed.2012.11.094

M3 - Article

C2 - 23561310

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VL - 45

SP - 136

EP - 142

JO - Journal of Emergency Medicine

JF - Journal of Emergency Medicine

SN - 0736-4679

IS - 1

ER -