Metabolic imprinting in obesity

Elinor Sullivan, Kevin Grove

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    81 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Increasing evidence indicates that early metabolic programming contributes to escalating obesity rates in children and adults. Metabolic imprinting is involved in the establishment of set points for physiologic and metabolic responses in adulthood. Evidence from epidemiological studies and animal models indicates that maternal health and nutritional status during gestation and lactation have long-term effects on central and peripheral systems that regulate energy balance in the developing offspring. Perinatal nutrition also impacts susceptibility to developing metabolic disorders and plays a role in programming body weight set points. The states of maternal energy status and health that are implicated in predisposing offspring to increased risk of developing obesity include maternal overnutrition, diabetes, and undernutrition. This chapter discusses the evidence from epidemiologic studies and animal models that each of these states of maternal energy status results in metabolic imprinting of obesity in offspring. Also, the potential molecular mediators of metabolic imprinting of obesity by maternal energy status including glucose, insulin, leptin, inflammatory cytokines and epigenetic mechanisms are considered.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationFrontiers in Eating and Weight Regulation
    PublisherS. Karger AG
    Pages186-194
    Number of pages9
    Volume63
    ISBN (Print)9783805593014, 9783805593007
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 10 2009

    Fingerprint

    Animals
    Obesity
    Mothers
    Health
    Nutrition
    Medical problems
    Leptin
    Energy balance
    Health Status
    Epidemiologic Studies
    Animal Models
    Overnutrition
    Insulin
    Cytokines
    Glucose
    Nutritional Status
    Lactation
    Epigenomics
    Malnutrition
    Body Weight

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)
    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

    Cite this

    Sullivan, E., & Grove, K. (2009). Metabolic imprinting in obesity. In Frontiers in Eating and Weight Regulation (Vol. 63, pp. 186-194). S. Karger AG. https://doi.org/10.1159/000264406

    Metabolic imprinting in obesity. / Sullivan, Elinor; Grove, Kevin.

    Frontiers in Eating and Weight Regulation. Vol. 63 S. Karger AG, 2009. p. 186-194.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Sullivan, E & Grove, K 2009, Metabolic imprinting in obesity. in Frontiers in Eating and Weight Regulation. vol. 63, S. Karger AG, pp. 186-194. https://doi.org/10.1159/000264406
    Sullivan E, Grove K. Metabolic imprinting in obesity. In Frontiers in Eating and Weight Regulation. Vol. 63. S. Karger AG. 2009. p. 186-194 https://doi.org/10.1159/000264406
    Sullivan, Elinor ; Grove, Kevin. / Metabolic imprinting in obesity. Frontiers in Eating and Weight Regulation. Vol. 63 S. Karger AG, 2009. pp. 186-194
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