Melanoma prevention

Pamela Cassidy, Douglas Grossman, Sancy Leachman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

UV radiation is the major environmental risk factor for melanoma; protection from exposure is an important primary prevention tool. Skin examinations by physician and patient self-exams are vital secondary prevention tools that stop progression of precursor lesions and early-stage melanomas. Enhancing DNA repair is a promising tactic for reducing UV-related melanoma risk. These strategies/agents require validation in appropriate clinical and preclinical models (Table 3.1). The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway participates in activation of oncogenes, making it a viable target for melanoma prevention despite limitations of epidemiological data supporting the efficacy of statins. These strategies/agents require validation in appropriate clinical and preclinical models (Table 3.1). NSAIDs could have some ability to lower the risk of melanoma. These strategies/agents require validation in appropriate clinical and preclinical models (Table 3.1). Antioxidants, including those derived from dietary agents, have promising activity for reducing UV-induced skin damage and for prevention of melanoma. These strategies/agents require validation in appropriate clinical and preclinical models (Table 3.1). IFN-α reduces phospho-STAT3 in dysplastic nevi, a promising biomarker of melanoma progression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEmerging Therapeutics for Melanoma
PublisherFuture Medicine Ltd.
Pages31-42
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)9781780840321, 9781780841168
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Melanoma
Dysplastic Nevus Syndrome
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Skin
Biosynthetic Pathways
Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Primary Prevention
Secondary Prevention
Oncogenes
DNA Repair
Antioxidants
Biomarkers
Cholesterol
Radiation
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cassidy, P., Grossman, D., & Leachman, S. (2012). Melanoma prevention. In Emerging Therapeutics for Melanoma (pp. 31-42). Future Medicine Ltd.. https://doi.org/10.2217/EBO.11.83

Melanoma prevention. / Cassidy, Pamela; Grossman, Douglas; Leachman, Sancy.

Emerging Therapeutics for Melanoma. Future Medicine Ltd., 2012. p. 31-42.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cassidy, P, Grossman, D & Leachman, S 2012, Melanoma prevention. in Emerging Therapeutics for Melanoma. Future Medicine Ltd., pp. 31-42. https://doi.org/10.2217/EBO.11.83
Cassidy P, Grossman D, Leachman S. Melanoma prevention. In Emerging Therapeutics for Melanoma. Future Medicine Ltd. 2012. p. 31-42 https://doi.org/10.2217/EBO.11.83
Cassidy, Pamela ; Grossman, Douglas ; Leachman, Sancy. / Melanoma prevention. Emerging Therapeutics for Melanoma. Future Medicine Ltd., 2012. pp. 31-42
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