Medicine, media, and celebrities

News coverage of breast cancer, 1960-1995

Julia B. Corbett, Motomi (Tomi) Mori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research investigated the relationship between medical activities, public events, and media coverage of breast cancer during a thirty-six-year period.1 There was substantial support for medical attention preceding media attention to breast cancer, and some evidence of medical attention following media coverage. There were extremely high, significant correlations between numbers of medical journal articles and newspaper, magazine, and TV coverage. Time-series analysis revealed a two-way, concurrent relationship between breast cancer funding and media coverage. Public events (prominent women acknowledging their breast cancer) significantly affected media coverage. There was a two-way concurrent relationship between breast cancer incidence and TV coverage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)229-249
Number of pages21
JournalJournalism and Mass Communication Quaterly
Volume76
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Time series analysis
VIP
Medicine
cancer
news
coverage
medicine
event
time series analysis
magazine
newspaper
incidence
funding
evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

Cite this

Medicine, media, and celebrities : News coverage of breast cancer, 1960-1995. / Corbett, Julia B.; Mori, Motomi (Tomi).

In: Journalism and Mass Communication Quaterly, Vol. 76, No. 2, 1999, p. 229-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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