Measurement of Reaction Time in the Home for People With Dementia: A Feasibility Study

Catherine S. Cole, Mark Mennemeier, James E. Bost, Laura Smith-Olinde, Diane Howieson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Cognitive decline is the cardinal symptom of dementia. Accurate measurement of changes in cognition, while essential for testing interventions to slow cognitive decline, can be challenging in people with dementia (PWD). For example, the laboratory environment may cause anxiety and negatively affect performance.Material and Method: In healthy people, researchers measure one aspect of cognition, attention, via assessing reaction times in a laboratory environment. This repeated-measures study investigated the feasibility of reaction time measurement in participants' homes using the computerized psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) for PWD. Research questions were (a) Can laboratory controls be replicated in the home? (b) Where do PWD perform PVT trials optimally? and (c) What are the preferences of PWD and their caregivers? Two groups that differed by sequence of testing location completed 12 reaction time assessments over 2 days. Caregiver and person with dementia dyad preferences were examined in a follow-up phone interview. Results: Complete data were collected from 14 dyads. Although there were slight differences in lighting between settings, the time of day, temperature, and sound did not differ. There were no significant differences in PVT performance between the two locations, but the group who tested in the home on Day 1 performed better than the group who tested in the lab on Day 1. All participants preferred home examination. Discussion: It is feasible to measure reaction times in the home. Home testing contributes to optimal performance and participants preferred the home.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-184
Number of pages6
JournalBiological Research for Nursing
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Feasibility Studies
Reaction Time
Dementia
Cognition
Caregivers
Task Performance and Analysis
Lighting
Anxiety
Research Personnel
Interviews
Temperature
Research

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • dementia
  • psychomotor vigilance task
  • reaction time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Research and Theory

Cite this

Measurement of Reaction Time in the Home for People With Dementia : A Feasibility Study. / Cole, Catherine S.; Mennemeier, Mark; Bost, James E.; Smith-Olinde, Laura; Howieson, Diane.

In: Biological Research for Nursing, Vol. 15, No. 2, 2013, p. 179-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cole, CS, Mennemeier, M, Bost, JE, Smith-Olinde, L & Howieson, D 2013, 'Measurement of Reaction Time in the Home for People With Dementia: A Feasibility Study', Biological Research for Nursing, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 179-184. https://doi.org/10.1177/1099800411420862
Cole, Catherine S. ; Mennemeier, Mark ; Bost, James E. ; Smith-Olinde, Laura ; Howieson, Diane. / Measurement of Reaction Time in the Home for People With Dementia : A Feasibility Study. In: Biological Research for Nursing. 2013 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 179-184.
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