Measurement of Amplitude and Delay of Stimulus Frequency Otoacoustic Emissions

Tianying Ren, Jiefu Zheng, Wenxuan He, Alfred Nuttall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Although stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) have been used as a non-invasive measure of cochlear mechanics, clinical and experimental application of SFOAEs has been limited by difficulties in accurately deriving quantitative information from sound pressure measured in the ear canal. In this study, a novel signal processing method for multicomponent analysis (MCA) was used to measure the amplitude and delay of the SFOAE. This report shows the delay-frequency distribution of the SFOAE measured from the human ear. A low level acoustical suppressor near the probe tone significantly suppressed the SFOAE, strongly indicating that the SFOAE was generated at characteristic frequency locations. Information derived from this method may reveal more details of cochlear mechanics in the human ear.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-62
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Otology
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

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Cochlea
Mechanics
Ear
Ear Canal
Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Measurement of Amplitude and Delay of Stimulus Frequency Otoacoustic Emissions. / Ren, Tianying; Zheng, Jiefu; He, Wenxuan; Nuttall, Alfred.

In: Journal of Otology, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.06.2013, p. 57-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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