Magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging of doxorubicin-loaded nanoparticles using a novel in vivo model

Ahmet Erten, Wolf Wrasidlo, Miriam Scadeng, Sadik Esener, Robert M. Hoffman, Michael Bouvet, Milan Makale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report here the in vivo combined-modality imaging of multifunctional drug delivery nanoparticles. These dextran core-based stealth liposomal nanoparticles (nanosomes) contained doxorubicin, iron oxide for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast, and BODIPY for fluorescence. The particles were long-lived in vivo because of surface decoration with polyethylene glycol and the incorporation of acetylated lipids that were ultraviolet cross-linked for physical stability. We developed a rodent dorsal skinfold window chamber that facilitated both MRI and non-invasive optical imaging of nanoparticle accumulation in the same tumors. Chamber tumors were genetically labeled with DsRed-2, which enabled co-localization of the MR images, the red fluorescence of the tumor, and the blue fluorescence of the nanoparticles. The nanoparticle design and MR imaging developed with the window chamber were then extended to orthotopic pancreatic tumors expressing DsRed-2. The tumors were MR-imaged using iron oxide-dextran liposomes and by fluorescence to demonstrate the deep imaging capability of these nanoparticles. From the Clinical Editor: In vivo combined-modality imaging of multifunctional drug delivery nanoparticles is discussed in this proof of principle paper.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)797-807
Number of pages11
JournalNanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine
Volume6
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Optical Imaging
Magnetic resonance
Nanoparticles
Doxorubicin
Fluorescence
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Imaging techniques
Tumors
Dextran
Neoplasms
Dextrans
Drug delivery
Iron oxides
Liposomes
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Lipids
Polyethylene glycols
Rodentia

Keywords

  • Dorsal skinfold window chamber
  • MRI
  • Multifunctional nanoparticle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging of doxorubicin-loaded nanoparticles using a novel in vivo model. / Erten, Ahmet; Wrasidlo, Wolf; Scadeng, Miriam; Esener, Sadik; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael; Makale, Milan.

In: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 6, 12.2010, p. 797-807.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Erten, Ahmet ; Wrasidlo, Wolf ; Scadeng, Miriam ; Esener, Sadik ; Hoffman, Robert M. ; Bouvet, Michael ; Makale, Milan. / Magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging of doxorubicin-loaded nanoparticles using a novel in vivo model. In: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 6, No. 6. pp. 797-807.
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