Low-dose antiprogestin treatment prevents pregnancy in rhesus monkeys and is reversible after 1 year of treatment

S. M. Borman, K. M. Schwinof, C. Niemeyer, K. Chwalisz, Richard Stouffer, Mary Zelinski

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Administration of low doses of an antiprogestin to rhesus monkeys permits ovarian/menstrual cyclicity, suppresses endomaterial proliferation and prevents pregnancy without adverse or toxic side-effects after 5-6 months of daily treatment. The purpose of this study was to test reversibility with respect to restoration of fertility after 1 year of low-dose antiprogestin treatment. Methods: This experiment included a daily 1 year vehicle- or antiprogestin-treatment interval followed by a 9 month post-treatment interval for adult, female rhesus monkeys (n = 5/group) of proven fertility and exhibiting regular menstrual cycles. Co-habitation occurred with a male of proven fertility and vaginal swabs were taken to identify the presence of sperm during the treatment (antiprogestin females) and post-treatment intervals (vehicle and antiprogestin females). Results: Mating and vaginal sperm were evident in all antiprogestin females during, and, in both groups, after treatment. Based on ultrasonography, none of the antiprogestin-treated females became pregnant during the treatment interval. However, upon cessation of treatment, pregnancy rates were similar between antiprogestin-treated (3/5) relative to vehicle-treated (4/5) females with live, healthy infants born in both groups. There were no differences between groups in fetal measurements, gestation lengths, live birth rates and infant weights. Conclusions: The reversal of the anti-fertility effects of chronic, low-dose antiprogestin treatment supports the clinical feasibility of potent and selective antiprogestins as potential contraceptives for women.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)69-76
    Number of pages8
    JournalHuman Reproduction
    Volume18
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

    Fingerprint

    Macaca mulatta
    Pregnancy
    Fertility
    Therapeutics
    Spermatozoa
    Fertility Agents
    Withholding Treatment
    Birth Rate
    Poisons
    Live Birth
    Periodicity
    Pregnancy Rate
    Menstrual Cycle
    Contraceptive Agents
    Ultrasonography
    Weights and Measures

    Keywords

    • Antiprogestin
    • Contraception
    • Pregnancy
    • Reversibility
    • ZK 137 316

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Physiology
    • Developmental Biology
    • Obstetrics and Gynecology
    • Reproductive Medicine

    Cite this

    Low-dose antiprogestin treatment prevents pregnancy in rhesus monkeys and is reversible after 1 year of treatment. / Borman, S. M.; Schwinof, K. M.; Niemeyer, C.; Chwalisz, K.; Stouffer, Richard; Zelinski, Mary.

    In: Human Reproduction, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 69-76.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    abstract = "Background: Administration of low doses of an antiprogestin to rhesus monkeys permits ovarian/menstrual cyclicity, suppresses endomaterial proliferation and prevents pregnancy without adverse or toxic side-effects after 5-6 months of daily treatment. The purpose of this study was to test reversibility with respect to restoration of fertility after 1 year of low-dose antiprogestin treatment. Methods: This experiment included a daily 1 year vehicle- or antiprogestin-treatment interval followed by a 9 month post-treatment interval for adult, female rhesus monkeys (n = 5/group) of proven fertility and exhibiting regular menstrual cycles. Co-habitation occurred with a male of proven fertility and vaginal swabs were taken to identify the presence of sperm during the treatment (antiprogestin females) and post-treatment intervals (vehicle and antiprogestin females). Results: Mating and vaginal sperm were evident in all antiprogestin females during, and, in both groups, after treatment. Based on ultrasonography, none of the antiprogestin-treated females became pregnant during the treatment interval. However, upon cessation of treatment, pregnancy rates were similar between antiprogestin-treated (3/5) relative to vehicle-treated (4/5) females with live, healthy infants born in both groups. There were no differences between groups in fetal measurements, gestation lengths, live birth rates and infant weights. Conclusions: The reversal of the anti-fertility effects of chronic, low-dose antiprogestin treatment supports the clinical feasibility of potent and selective antiprogestins as potential contraceptives for women.",
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    AU - Chwalisz, K.

    AU - Stouffer, Richard

    AU - Zelinski, Mary

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    N2 - Background: Administration of low doses of an antiprogestin to rhesus monkeys permits ovarian/menstrual cyclicity, suppresses endomaterial proliferation and prevents pregnancy without adverse or toxic side-effects after 5-6 months of daily treatment. The purpose of this study was to test reversibility with respect to restoration of fertility after 1 year of low-dose antiprogestin treatment. Methods: This experiment included a daily 1 year vehicle- or antiprogestin-treatment interval followed by a 9 month post-treatment interval for adult, female rhesus monkeys (n = 5/group) of proven fertility and exhibiting regular menstrual cycles. Co-habitation occurred with a male of proven fertility and vaginal swabs were taken to identify the presence of sperm during the treatment (antiprogestin females) and post-treatment intervals (vehicle and antiprogestin females). Results: Mating and vaginal sperm were evident in all antiprogestin females during, and, in both groups, after treatment. Based on ultrasonography, none of the antiprogestin-treated females became pregnant during the treatment interval. However, upon cessation of treatment, pregnancy rates were similar between antiprogestin-treated (3/5) relative to vehicle-treated (4/5) females with live, healthy infants born in both groups. There were no differences between groups in fetal measurements, gestation lengths, live birth rates and infant weights. Conclusions: The reversal of the anti-fertility effects of chronic, low-dose antiprogestin treatment supports the clinical feasibility of potent and selective antiprogestins as potential contraceptives for women.

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