Long-term assessment of percutaneous stereotactic thermocoagulation of upper thoracic ganglionectomy and sympathectomy for palmar and craniofacial hyperhidrosis in 1742 cases

King Shun Chuang, Jiang Chuan Liu, Kim J. Burchiel, Philip L. Gildenberg, David G. Kline, Harold A. Wilkinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the long-term outcome of percutaneous stereotactic thermocoagulation for upper thoracic ganglionectomy and sympathectomy in patients with palmar and craniofacial hyperhidrosis with the use of a three-dimensional system of coordinates for the location of the T2 and T3 ganglia on the basis of the findings in a cadaveric study. METHODS: From November 1986 to May 1998, upper thoracic ganglionectomy and sympathectomy with the use of percutaneous stereotactic thermocoagulation were performed in 1688 patients with palmar hyperhidrosis and 54 patients with craniofacial hyperhidrosis as outpatient surgical procedures based on a three-dimensional coordinate system for determining the location of the thermocoagulation point, which was developed by the authors in a cadaveric study. The technique requires only local anesthesia. RESULTS: After initial thermocoagulation, sweating stopped in 3465 (99.5%) of 3484 sides. Hyperhidrosis recurred within 2 to 59 months of treatment in 268 procedures. All patients in whom hyperhidrosis recurred were retreated successfully, resulting in a final success rate of 99.9%. Complications of treatment included pneumothorax in seven procedures (0.2%) and partial Horner's syndrome in five procedures (0.15%). Decreased plantar sweating was noted during follow-up in 92% of patients. CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that upper thoracic ganglionectomy and sympathectomy performed with the use of percutaneous thermocoagulation are a very effective treatment for palmar and craniofacial hyperhidrosis that provides excellent immediate and long-term results as well as a low complication rate. The method is also effective as a retreatment for recurrences. Our data also suggest that performing ganglionectomy and sympathectomy in both T2 and T3 is unnecessary, because the procedure had equal long-term effectiveness when performed in T2 alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)963-970
Number of pages8
JournalNeurosurgery
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002

Keywords

  • Craniofacial hyperhidrosis
  • Palmar hyperhidrosis
  • Percutaneous thermocoagulation
  • Thoracic ganglionectomy
  • Thoracic sympathectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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