Lipolysis and lipid oxidation in cirrhosis and after liver transplantation

Robert Shangraw, Farook Jahoor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

On the basis of the finding that plasma glycerol concentration is not controlled by clearance in healthy humans, it has been proposed that elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA) and glycerol concentrations in cirrhotic subjects are caused by accelerated lipolysis. This proposal has not been validated. We infused 10 volunteers, 10 cirrhotic subjects, and 10 patients after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) with [1-13C]palmitate and [2H5]glycerol to compare fluxes (R(a)) and FFA oxidation. Cirrhotic subjects had higher plasma palmitate (52%) and glycerol (33%) concentrations than controls. Palmitate R(a) was faster (1.45 ± 0.18 vs. 0.85 ± 0.17 μmol · kg-1 · min-1) but glycerol R(a) and clearance slower (1.20 ± 0.09 vs. 1.90 ± 0.24 μmol · kg-1 · min-1 and 21.2 ± 1.2 vs. 44.7 ± 4.9 ml · kg- · h-1, respectively) than in controls. After OLT, plasma palmitate and glycerol concentrations and palmitate R(a) did not differ, but glycerol R(a) (1.16 ± 0.11 μmol · kg-1 · min-1) and clearance (26.7 ± 2.4 ml · kg- · h-1) were slower than in controls. We conclude that 1) impaired reesterification, not accelerated lipolysis, elevates FFA in cirrhotic subjects; 2) normalized FFA after OLT masks impaired reesterification; and 3) plasma glycerol concentration poorly reflects lipolytic rate in cirrhosis and after OLT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Volume278
Issue number6 41-6
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Lipolysis
Liver Transplantation
Glycerol
Fibrosis
Palmitates
Lipids
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Masks
Volunteers

Keywords

  • Glycerol
  • Humans
  • Insulin
  • Palmitate
  • Reesterification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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title = "Lipolysis and lipid oxidation in cirrhosis and after liver transplantation",
abstract = "On the basis of the finding that plasma glycerol concentration is not controlled by clearance in healthy humans, it has been proposed that elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA) and glycerol concentrations in cirrhotic subjects are caused by accelerated lipolysis. This proposal has not been validated. We infused 10 volunteers, 10 cirrhotic subjects, and 10 patients after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) with [1-13C]palmitate and [2H5]glycerol to compare fluxes (R(a)) and FFA oxidation. Cirrhotic subjects had higher plasma palmitate (52{\%}) and glycerol (33{\%}) concentrations than controls. Palmitate R(a) was faster (1.45 ± 0.18 vs. 0.85 ± 0.17 μmol · kg-1 · min-1) but glycerol R(a) and clearance slower (1.20 ± 0.09 vs. 1.90 ± 0.24 μmol · kg-1 · min-1 and 21.2 ± 1.2 vs. 44.7 ± 4.9 ml · kg- · h-1, respectively) than in controls. After OLT, plasma palmitate and glycerol concentrations and palmitate R(a) did not differ, but glycerol R(a) (1.16 ± 0.11 μmol · kg-1 · min-1) and clearance (26.7 ± 2.4 ml · kg- · h-1) were slower than in controls. We conclude that 1) impaired reesterification, not accelerated lipolysis, elevates FFA in cirrhotic subjects; 2) normalized FFA after OLT masks impaired reesterification; and 3) plasma glycerol concentration poorly reflects lipolytic rate in cirrhosis and after OLT.",
keywords = "Glycerol, Humans, Insulin, Palmitate, Reesterification",
author = "Robert Shangraw and Farook Jahoor",
year = "2000",
language = "English (US)",
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journal = "American Journal of Physiology - Renal Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology",
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T1 - Lipolysis and lipid oxidation in cirrhosis and after liver transplantation

AU - Shangraw, Robert

AU - Jahoor, Farook

PY - 2000

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N2 - On the basis of the finding that plasma glycerol concentration is not controlled by clearance in healthy humans, it has been proposed that elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA) and glycerol concentrations in cirrhotic subjects are caused by accelerated lipolysis. This proposal has not been validated. We infused 10 volunteers, 10 cirrhotic subjects, and 10 patients after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) with [1-13C]palmitate and [2H5]glycerol to compare fluxes (R(a)) and FFA oxidation. Cirrhotic subjects had higher plasma palmitate (52%) and glycerol (33%) concentrations than controls. Palmitate R(a) was faster (1.45 ± 0.18 vs. 0.85 ± 0.17 μmol · kg-1 · min-1) but glycerol R(a) and clearance slower (1.20 ± 0.09 vs. 1.90 ± 0.24 μmol · kg-1 · min-1 and 21.2 ± 1.2 vs. 44.7 ± 4.9 ml · kg- · h-1, respectively) than in controls. After OLT, plasma palmitate and glycerol concentrations and palmitate R(a) did not differ, but glycerol R(a) (1.16 ± 0.11 μmol · kg-1 · min-1) and clearance (26.7 ± 2.4 ml · kg- · h-1) were slower than in controls. We conclude that 1) impaired reesterification, not accelerated lipolysis, elevates FFA in cirrhotic subjects; 2) normalized FFA after OLT masks impaired reesterification; and 3) plasma glycerol concentration poorly reflects lipolytic rate in cirrhosis and after OLT.

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