Lesions that cause aortic flow disturbances

S. J. Goldberg, J. Areias, L. Feldman, David Sahn, H. D. Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Echo Doppler examination purports to localize the origin of flow disturbances within the heart or great vessels. During our investigation of echo Doppler, frequency dispersions found in the transverse aortic arch, ascending aorta or right pulmonary artery that should indicate flow disturbances in those areas occurred in a set of lesions that did not involve the expected cardiac anatomic abnormalities. To learn the range of this false-positive problem, we reviewed all of our documented cases in which an echo Doppler had been obtained (n=127). Our results indicate that 48% of our patients who had right pulmonary artery disturbances had additional flow disturbances detected in the ascending aorta or transverse aortic arch despite the fact that cardiac catheterization in these patients indicated absence of an anatomic abnormality in the left side of the heart. These false positives had the highest incidence of occurrence in patients who had high left cardiac output, but this also occurred in four instances in which the only cardiac lesion was pulmonary stenosis. The latter is thought to be due to an induced flow disturbance. We also found two patients whose only lesion was aortic stenosis, but these patients had secondary flow disturbances in the pulmonaroy artery; these two instances probably represent a flow disturbance induced from the aorta to the pulmonary artery. Knowledge of this set of false-positive results is important for proper interpretation of echo Doppler examinations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1539-1547
Number of pages9
JournalCirculation
Volume60
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1979
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Thoracic Aorta
Pulmonary Artery
Aorta
High Cardiac Output
Pulmonary Valve Stenosis
Aortic Valve Stenosis
Cardiac Catheterization
Arteries
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Goldberg, S. J., Areias, J., Feldman, L., Sahn, D., & Allen, H. D. (1979). Lesions that cause aortic flow disturbances. Circulation, 60(7), 1539-1547.

Lesions that cause aortic flow disturbances. / Goldberg, S. J.; Areias, J.; Feldman, L.; Sahn, David; Allen, H. D.

In: Circulation, Vol. 60, No. 7, 1979, p. 1539-1547.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goldberg, SJ, Areias, J, Feldman, L, Sahn, D & Allen, HD 1979, 'Lesions that cause aortic flow disturbances', Circulation, vol. 60, no. 7, pp. 1539-1547.
Goldberg SJ, Areias J, Feldman L, Sahn D, Allen HD. Lesions that cause aortic flow disturbances. Circulation. 1979;60(7):1539-1547.
Goldberg, S. J. ; Areias, J. ; Feldman, L. ; Sahn, David ; Allen, H. D. / Lesions that cause aortic flow disturbances. In: Circulation. 1979 ; Vol. 60, No. 7. pp. 1539-1547.
@article{b5c95c1c9e5647fe88e37a6ab07692e4,
title = "Lesions that cause aortic flow disturbances",
abstract = "Echo Doppler examination purports to localize the origin of flow disturbances within the heart or great vessels. During our investigation of echo Doppler, frequency dispersions found in the transverse aortic arch, ascending aorta or right pulmonary artery that should indicate flow disturbances in those areas occurred in a set of lesions that did not involve the expected cardiac anatomic abnormalities. To learn the range of this false-positive problem, we reviewed all of our documented cases in which an echo Doppler had been obtained (n=127). Our results indicate that 48{\%} of our patients who had right pulmonary artery disturbances had additional flow disturbances detected in the ascending aorta or transverse aortic arch despite the fact that cardiac catheterization in these patients indicated absence of an anatomic abnormality in the left side of the heart. These false positives had the highest incidence of occurrence in patients who had high left cardiac output, but this also occurred in four instances in which the only cardiac lesion was pulmonary stenosis. The latter is thought to be due to an induced flow disturbance. We also found two patients whose only lesion was aortic stenosis, but these patients had secondary flow disturbances in the pulmonaroy artery; these two instances probably represent a flow disturbance induced from the aorta to the pulmonary artery. Knowledge of this set of false-positive results is important for proper interpretation of echo Doppler examinations.",
author = "Goldberg, {S. J.} and J. Areias and L. Feldman and David Sahn and Allen, {H. D.}",
year = "1979",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "60",
pages = "1539--1547",
journal = "Circulation",
issn = "0009-7322",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lesions that cause aortic flow disturbances

AU - Goldberg, S. J.

AU - Areias, J.

AU - Feldman, L.

AU - Sahn, David

AU - Allen, H. D.

PY - 1979

Y1 - 1979

N2 - Echo Doppler examination purports to localize the origin of flow disturbances within the heart or great vessels. During our investigation of echo Doppler, frequency dispersions found in the transverse aortic arch, ascending aorta or right pulmonary artery that should indicate flow disturbances in those areas occurred in a set of lesions that did not involve the expected cardiac anatomic abnormalities. To learn the range of this false-positive problem, we reviewed all of our documented cases in which an echo Doppler had been obtained (n=127). Our results indicate that 48% of our patients who had right pulmonary artery disturbances had additional flow disturbances detected in the ascending aorta or transverse aortic arch despite the fact that cardiac catheterization in these patients indicated absence of an anatomic abnormality in the left side of the heart. These false positives had the highest incidence of occurrence in patients who had high left cardiac output, but this also occurred in four instances in which the only cardiac lesion was pulmonary stenosis. The latter is thought to be due to an induced flow disturbance. We also found two patients whose only lesion was aortic stenosis, but these patients had secondary flow disturbances in the pulmonaroy artery; these two instances probably represent a flow disturbance induced from the aorta to the pulmonary artery. Knowledge of this set of false-positive results is important for proper interpretation of echo Doppler examinations.

AB - Echo Doppler examination purports to localize the origin of flow disturbances within the heart or great vessels. During our investigation of echo Doppler, frequency dispersions found in the transverse aortic arch, ascending aorta or right pulmonary artery that should indicate flow disturbances in those areas occurred in a set of lesions that did not involve the expected cardiac anatomic abnormalities. To learn the range of this false-positive problem, we reviewed all of our documented cases in which an echo Doppler had been obtained (n=127). Our results indicate that 48% of our patients who had right pulmonary artery disturbances had additional flow disturbances detected in the ascending aorta or transverse aortic arch despite the fact that cardiac catheterization in these patients indicated absence of an anatomic abnormality in the left side of the heart. These false positives had the highest incidence of occurrence in patients who had high left cardiac output, but this also occurred in four instances in which the only cardiac lesion was pulmonary stenosis. The latter is thought to be due to an induced flow disturbance. We also found two patients whose only lesion was aortic stenosis, but these patients had secondary flow disturbances in the pulmonaroy artery; these two instances probably represent a flow disturbance induced from the aorta to the pulmonary artery. Knowledge of this set of false-positive results is important for proper interpretation of echo Doppler examinations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0018732846&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0018732846&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 498482

AN - SCOPUS:0018732846

VL - 60

SP - 1539

EP - 1547

JO - Circulation

JF - Circulation

SN - 0009-7322

IS - 7

ER -