Is there a causal association between excess mortality and exposure to PM-10 air pollution? additional analyses by location, year, season, and cause of death

Joseph L. Lyon, Motomi (Tomi) Mori, Renlu Gao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the association between exposure to PM-10 air pollution and daily mortality in Utah County, Utah, for 1985-1992. We confirmed the previous finding that exposure to fine particulate air pollution (particulate diameter of 3 increased daily mortality by 4% The potential importance of this observation led us to test the association more rigorously by assessing rate ratios (RR) of PM-10 for year, season, and location at time of death. For individual years there was no statistically significant association between increased mortality and exposure to PM-10 air pollution. The strongest mortality effect was seen in the spring, not the winter. The largest numeric contribution to excess mortality was from individuals age 75 + yr dying in a hospital, and the largest RR was for individuals ages 15-59 yr dying at home, primarily of cancer. These findings do not support a causal association between exposure to PM-10 air pollution and daily mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)603-614
Number of pages12
JournalInhalation Toxicology
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Air Pollution
Air pollution
Cause of Death
Mortality
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

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abstract = "We examined the association between exposure to PM-10 air pollution and daily mortality in Utah County, Utah, for 1985-1992. We confirmed the previous finding that exposure to fine particulate air pollution (particulate diameter of 3 increased daily mortality by 4{\%} The potential importance of this observation led us to test the association more rigorously by assessing rate ratios (RR) of PM-10 for year, season, and location at time of death. For individual years there was no statistically significant association between increased mortality and exposure to PM-10 air pollution. The strongest mortality effect was seen in the spring, not the winter. The largest numeric contribution to excess mortality was from individuals age 75 + yr dying in a hospital, and the largest RR was for individuals ages 15-59 yr dying at home, primarily of cancer. These findings do not support a causal association between exposure to PM-10 air pollution and daily mortality.",
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AU - Gao, Renlu

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