Iron in mammals: Pathophysiological mechanisms of overload and deficiency in relation to disease

Martha B. Johnson, Caroline A. Enns, An Sheng Zhang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The uptake of iron into the body is tightly regulated in humans and in other mammals. Mutations in key proteins that transport, sense, metabolize, and facilitate the utilization of iron cause perturbations in iron homeostasis that result in iron deficiency or overload diseases. This review focuses on what is currently known about these diseases and the normal function of the proteins that are mutated in the disease-state. The proteins causing hereditary hemochromatosis and anemia are discussed in detail.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMetal Homeotsasis and Detoxification
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Microbes to Man
EditorsMarkus Tamas, Enrico
Pages155-191
Number of pages37
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 27 2006

Publication series

NameTopics in Current Genetics
Volume14
ISSN (Print)1610-2096
ISSN (Electronic)1610-6970

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

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    Johnson, M. B., Enns, C. A., & Zhang, A. S. (2006). Iron in mammals: Pathophysiological mechanisms of overload and deficiency in relation to disease. In M. Tamas, & Enrico (Eds.), Metal Homeotsasis and Detoxification: From Microbes to Man (pp. 155-191). (Topics in Current Genetics; Vol. 14). https://doi.org/10.1007/4735_99