Integrating patient-generated health data into clinical care settings or clinical decision-making: Lessons learned from project HealthDesign

Deborah J. Cohen, Sara R. Keller, Gillian R. Hayes, David Dorr, Joan Ash, Dean F. Sittig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Patient-generated health data (PGHD) are health-related data created or recorded by patients to inform their self-care and understanding about their own health. PGHD is different from other patient-reported outcome data because the collection of data is patient-driven, not practice- or research-driven. Technical applications for assisting patients to collect PGHD supports self-management activities such as healthy eating and exercise and can be important for preventing and managing disease. Technological innovations (eg, activity trackers) are making it more common for people to collect PGHD, but little is known about how PGHD might be used in outpatient clinics. Objective: The objective of our study was to examine the experiences of health care professionals who use PGHD in outpatient clinics. Methods: We conducted an evaluation of Project HealthDesign Round 2 to synthesize findings from 5 studies funded to test tools designed to help patients collect PGHD and share these data with members of their health care team. We conducted semistructured interviews with 13 Project HealthDesign study team members and 12 health care professionals that participated in these studies. We used an immersion-crystallization approach to analyze data. Our findings provide important information related to health care professionals' attitudes toward and experiences with using PGHD in a clinical setting. Results: Health care professionals identified 3 main benefits of PGHD accessibility in clinical settings: (1) deeper insight into a patient's condition; (2) more accurate patient information, particularly when of clinical relevance; and (3) insight into a patient's health between clinic visits, enabling revision of care plans for improved health goal achievement, while avoiding unnecessary clinic visits. Study participants also identified 3 areas of consideration when implementing collection and use of PGHD data in clinics: (1) developing practice workflows and protocols related to PGHD collection and use; (2) data storage, accessibility at the point of care, and privacy concerns; and (3) ease of using PGHD data. Conclusions: PGHD provides value to both patients and health care professionals. However, more research is needed to understand the benefit of using PGHD in clinical care and to identify the strategies and clinic workflow needs for optimizing these tools.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere26
JournalJMIR Human Factors
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Keywords

  • Chronic disease
  • Doctor-patient relations
  • Mobile applications
  • Self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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