Inhibitory network interactions shape the auditory processing of natural communication signals in the songbird auditory forebrain

Raphael Pinaud, Thomas A. Terleph, Liisa A. Tremere, Mimi L. Phan, André A. Dagostin, Ricardo M. Leão, Claudio Mello, David S. Vicario

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of GABA in the central processing of complex auditory signals is not fully understood. We have studied the involvement of GABA A-mediated inhibition in the processing of birdsong, a learned vocal communication signal requiring intact hearing for its development and maintenance. We focused on caudomedial nidopallium (NCM), an area analogous to parts of the mammalian auditory cortex with selective responses to birdsong. We present evidence that GABAA-mediated inhibition plays a pronounced role in NCM's auditory processing of birdsong. Using immunocytochemistry, we show that approximately half of NCM's neurons are GABAergic. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings in a slice preparation demonstrate that, at rest, spontaneously active GABAergic synapses inhibit excitatory inputs onto NCM neurons via GABAA receptors. Multi-electrode electrophysiological recordings in awake birds show that local blockade of GABAA-mediated inhibition in NCM markedly affects the temporal pattern of song-evoked responses in NCM without modifications in frequency tuning. Surprisingly, this blockade increases the phasic and largely suppresses the tonic response component, reflecting dynamic relationships of inhibitory networks that could include disinhibition. Thus processing of learned natural communication sounds in songbirds, and possibly other vocal learners, may depend on complex interactions of inhibitory networks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)441-455
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume100
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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Songbirds
Prosencephalon
Communication
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
GABAergic Neurons
Auditory Cortex
GABA-A Receptors
Music
Synapses
Hearing
Birds
Electrodes
Immunohistochemistry
Maintenance
Neurons
Inhibition (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Pinaud, R., Terleph, T. A., Tremere, L. A., Phan, M. L., Dagostin, A. A., Leão, R. M., ... Vicario, D. S. (2008). Inhibitory network interactions shape the auditory processing of natural communication signals in the songbird auditory forebrain. Journal of Neurophysiology, 100(1), 441-455. https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.01239.2007

Inhibitory network interactions shape the auditory processing of natural communication signals in the songbird auditory forebrain. / Pinaud, Raphael; Terleph, Thomas A.; Tremere, Liisa A.; Phan, Mimi L.; Dagostin, André A.; Leão, Ricardo M.; Mello, Claudio; Vicario, David S.

In: Journal of Neurophysiology, Vol. 100, No. 1, 07.2008, p. 441-455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pinaud, Raphael ; Terleph, Thomas A. ; Tremere, Liisa A. ; Phan, Mimi L. ; Dagostin, André A. ; Leão, Ricardo M. ; Mello, Claudio ; Vicario, David S. / Inhibitory network interactions shape the auditory processing of natural communication signals in the songbird auditory forebrain. In: Journal of Neurophysiology. 2008 ; Vol. 100, No. 1. pp. 441-455.
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