In vivo MR imaging and spectroscopy using hyperpolarized 129Xe

Mark E. Wagshul, Terry M. Button, Haifang F. Li, Zhengrong Liang, Charles Jr Springer, Kai Zhong, Arnold Wishnia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

120 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hyperpolarized 129Xe has been used to obtain gas phase images of mouse lung in vivo, showing distinct ventilation variation as a function of the breathing cycle. Spectra of 129Xe in the thorax show complex structure in both the gas phase (-4 to 3 ppm) and tissue-dissolved (190-205 ppm) regions. The alveolar gas peak shows correlated intensity and frequency oscillations, both attributable to changes in lung volume during breathing. The two major dissolved peaks near 198-200 ppm are attributed to lung parenchyma and to blood; they reach maximum intensity in 5-10 s and decay with an apparent T1 of 30 s. Another peak at 190 ppm takes 20-30 s to reach maximum; this must represent other well-vascularized tissue (e.g., heart and other muscles) in the thorax. The maximum integrated area of the tissue components reaches 30-80% of the maximum alveolar gas area, indicating that imaging at tissue frequencies can be achieved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-191
Number of pages9
JournalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume36
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Gases
Lung
Respiration
Thorax
Ventilation
Myocardium

Keywords

  • bulk magnetic susceptibility
  • hyperpolarized Xe
  • in vivo Xe spectroscopy
  • MRI of lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Wagshul, M. E., Button, T. M., Li, H. F., Liang, Z., Springer, C. J., Zhong, K., & Wishnia, A. (1996). In vivo MR imaging and spectroscopy using hyperpolarized 129Xe. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 36(2), 183-191.

In vivo MR imaging and spectroscopy using hyperpolarized 129Xe. / Wagshul, Mark E.; Button, Terry M.; Li, Haifang F.; Liang, Zhengrong; Springer, Charles Jr; Zhong, Kai; Wishnia, Arnold.

In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Vol. 36, No. 2, 08.1996, p. 183-191.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wagshul, ME, Button, TM, Li, HF, Liang, Z, Springer, CJ, Zhong, K & Wishnia, A 1996, 'In vivo MR imaging and spectroscopy using hyperpolarized 129Xe', Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 183-191.
Wagshul ME, Button TM, Li HF, Liang Z, Springer CJ, Zhong K et al. In vivo MR imaging and spectroscopy using hyperpolarized 129Xe. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. 1996 Aug;36(2):183-191.
Wagshul, Mark E. ; Button, Terry M. ; Li, Haifang F. ; Liang, Zhengrong ; Springer, Charles Jr ; Zhong, Kai ; Wishnia, Arnold. / In vivo MR imaging and spectroscopy using hyperpolarized 129Xe. In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. 1996 ; Vol. 36, No. 2. pp. 183-191.
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