Implantable Electronic Cardiac Devices and Compatibility With Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Jared Miller, Saman Nazarian, Henry R. Halperin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is a growing population of patients with implanted electronic cardiac devices and a concomitant increase in the use of magnetic resonance (MR). There are theoretical safety risks posed to such devices by MR. However, there are now considerable laboratory data and clinical experience demonstrating safety in this setting, assuming appropriate device selection and patient monitoring. Herein, we review these data and our safety protocol and the new generation of devices that have been prospectively designed and tested to be safe for MR scanning, assuming certain conditions are met (i.e., devices that are MR-conditional). We also argue that the available data do not support a complete transition to implantation of MR-conditional devices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1590-1598
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume68
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 4 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Equipment and Supplies
Safety
Physiologic Monitoring
Population

Keywords

  • arrhythmia
  • cardiac implantable cardioverter-defibrillator
  • pacemaker

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Implantable Electronic Cardiac Devices and Compatibility With Magnetic Resonance Imaging. / Miller, Jared; Nazarian, Saman; Halperin, Henry R.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 68, No. 14, 04.10.2016, p. 1590-1598.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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