Implantable diagnostic device for cancer monitoring

Karen D. Daniel, Grace Y. Kim, Christophoros C. Vassiliou, Marilyn Galindo, Alexander Guimaraes, Ralph Weissleder, Al Charest, Robert Langer, Michael J. Cima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biopsies provide required information to diagnose cancer but, because of their invasiveness, they are difficult to use for managing cancer therapy. The ability to repeatedly sample the local environment for tumor biomarker, chemotherapeutic agent, and tumor metabolite concentrations could improve early detection of metastasis and personalized therapy. Here we describe an implantable diagnostic device that senses the local in vivo environment. This device, which could be left behind during biopsy, uses a semi-permeable membrane to contain nanoparticle magnetic relaxation switches. A cell line secreting a model cancer biomarker produced ectopic tumors in mice. The transverse relaxation time (T2) of devices in tumor-bearing mice was 20 ± 10% lower than devices in control mice after 1 day by magnetic resonance imaging (p <0.01). Short term applications for this device are numerous, including verification of successful tumor resection. This may represent the first continuous monitoring device for soluble cancer biomarkers in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3252-3257
Number of pages6
JournalBiosensors and Bioelectronics
Volume24
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tumors
Tumor Biomarkers
Equipment and Supplies
Biopsy
Monitoring
Neoplasms
Bearings (structural)
Magnetic relaxation
Magnetic resonance
Metabolites
Relaxation time
Cells
Switches
Nanoparticles
Membranes
Imaging techniques
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Neoplasm Metastasis
Cell Line
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Cancer biomarker
  • Human chorionic gonadotrophin
  • In vivo sensor
  • Magnetic nanoparticle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biotechnology
  • Electrochemistry

Cite this

Daniel, K. D., Kim, G. Y., Vassiliou, C. C., Galindo, M., Guimaraes, A., Weissleder, R., ... Cima, M. J. (2009). Implantable diagnostic device for cancer monitoring. Biosensors and Bioelectronics, 24(11), 3252-3257. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2009.04.010

Implantable diagnostic device for cancer monitoring. / Daniel, Karen D.; Kim, Grace Y.; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; Galindo, Marilyn; Guimaraes, Alexander; Weissleder, Ralph; Charest, Al; Langer, Robert; Cima, Michael J.

In: Biosensors and Bioelectronics, Vol. 24, No. 11, 15.07.2009, p. 3252-3257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Daniel, KD, Kim, GY, Vassiliou, CC, Galindo, M, Guimaraes, A, Weissleder, R, Charest, A, Langer, R & Cima, MJ 2009, 'Implantable diagnostic device for cancer monitoring', Biosensors and Bioelectronics, vol. 24, no. 11, pp. 3252-3257. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2009.04.010
Daniel KD, Kim GY, Vassiliou CC, Galindo M, Guimaraes A, Weissleder R et al. Implantable diagnostic device for cancer monitoring. Biosensors and Bioelectronics. 2009 Jul 15;24(11):3252-3257. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2009.04.010
Daniel, Karen D. ; Kim, Grace Y. ; Vassiliou, Christophoros C. ; Galindo, Marilyn ; Guimaraes, Alexander ; Weissleder, Ralph ; Charest, Al ; Langer, Robert ; Cima, Michael J. / Implantable diagnostic device for cancer monitoring. In: Biosensors and Bioelectronics. 2009 ; Vol. 24, No. 11. pp. 3252-3257.
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