Impact of residency training redesign on residents’ clinical knowledge

Elaine Waller, M (Patrice) Eiff, Eve Dexter, Jason C.B. Rinaldo, Miguel Marino, Roger Garvin, Alan B. Douglass, Robert Phillips, Larry A. Green, Patricia (Patty) Carney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The In-training Examination (ITE) is a frequently used method to evaluate family medicine residents’ clinical knowledge. We compared family medicine ITE scores among residents who trained in the 14 programs that participated in the Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4) Project to national averages over time, and according to educational innovations. METHODS: The ITE scores of 802 consenting P4 residents who trained in 2007 through 2011 were obtained from the American Board of Family Medicine. The primary analysis involved comparing scores within each academic year (2007 through 2011), according to program year (PGY) for P4 residents to all residents nationally. A secondary analysis compared ITE scores among residents in programs that experimented with length of training and compared scores among residents in programs that offered individualized education options with those that did not. RESULTS: Release of ITE scores was consented to by 95.5% of residents for this study. Scores of P4 residents were higher compared to national scores in each year. For example, in 2011, the mean P4 score for PGY1 was 401.2, compared to the national average of 386. For PGY2, the mean P4 score was 443.1, compared to the national average of 427, and for PGY3, the mean P4 score was 477.0, compared to the national PGY3 score of 456. Scores of residents in programs that experimented with length of training were similar to those in programs that did not. Scores were also similar between residents in programs with and without individualized education options. CONCLUSIONS: Family medicine residency programs undergoing substantial educational changes, including experiments in length of training and individualized education, did not appear to experience a negative effect on resident’s clinical knowledge, as measured by ITE scores. Further research is needed to study the effect of a wide range of residency training innovations on ITE scores over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)693-698
Number of pages6
JournalFamily Medicine
Volume49
Issue number9
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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Internship and Residency
Medicine
Education
Clinical Medicine
Physicians
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

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Impact of residency training redesign on residents’ clinical knowledge. / Waller, Elaine; Eiff, M (Patrice); Dexter, Eve; Rinaldo, Jason C.B.; Marino, Miguel; Garvin, Roger; Douglass, Alan B.; Phillips, Robert; Green, Larry A.; Carney, Patricia (Patty).

In: Family Medicine, Vol. 49, No. 9, 01.10.2017, p. 693-698.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Waller, E, Eiff, MP, Dexter, E, Rinaldo, JCB, Marino, M, Garvin, R, Douglass, AB, Phillips, R, Green, LA & Carney, PP 2017, 'Impact of residency training redesign on residents’ clinical knowledge', Family Medicine, vol. 49, no. 9, pp. 693-698.
Waller, Elaine ; Eiff, M (Patrice) ; Dexter, Eve ; Rinaldo, Jason C.B. ; Marino, Miguel ; Garvin, Roger ; Douglass, Alan B. ; Phillips, Robert ; Green, Larry A. ; Carney, Patricia (Patty). / Impact of residency training redesign on residents’ clinical knowledge. In: Family Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 49, No. 9. pp. 693-698.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The In-training Examination (ITE) is a frequently used method to evaluate family medicine residents’ clinical knowledge. We compared family medicine ITE scores among residents who trained in the 14 programs that participated in the Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4) Project to national averages over time, and according to educational innovations. METHODS: The ITE scores of 802 consenting P4 residents who trained in 2007 through 2011 were obtained from the American Board of Family Medicine. The primary analysis involved comparing scores within each academic year (2007 through 2011), according to program year (PGY) for P4 residents to all residents nationally. A secondary analysis compared ITE scores among residents in programs that experimented with length of training and compared scores among residents in programs that offered individualized education options with those that did not. RESULTS: Release of ITE scores was consented to by 95.5{\%} of residents for this study. Scores of P4 residents were higher compared to national scores in each year. For example, in 2011, the mean P4 score for PGY1 was 401.2, compared to the national average of 386. For PGY2, the mean P4 score was 443.1, compared to the national average of 427, and for PGY3, the mean P4 score was 477.0, compared to the national PGY3 score of 456. Scores of residents in programs that experimented with length of training were similar to those in programs that did not. Scores were also similar between residents in programs with and without individualized education options. CONCLUSIONS: Family medicine residency programs undergoing substantial educational changes, including experiments in length of training and individualized education, did not appear to experience a negative effect on resident’s clinical knowledge, as measured by ITE scores. Further research is needed to study the effect of a wide range of residency training innovations on ITE scores over time.",
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AU - Garvin, Roger

AU - Douglass, Alan B.

AU - Phillips, Robert

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