Idiopathic myelofibrosis

dental treatment considerations.

Robert Steelman, D. Holmes, R. Cranston, D. Cupp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Idiopathic myelofibrosis is a myeloproliferative disorder of unknown origin. The bone marrow becomes fibrotic with an associated decrease in hematopoiesis resulting in anemia, bleeding problems, splenomegaly, and other secondary abnormalities. Although idiopathic myelofibrosis is usually diagnosed in middle age, there have been a few reports of the disorder in the pediatric population. This case report documents dental treatment considerations in a 6-year-old female with idiopathic myelofibrosis, severe anemia, and abnormal blood coagulation studies. The patient was successfully treated in a hospital after medical consultation, transfusion of packed red blood cells, and administration of prophylactic antibiotics. Local hemostatic measures following multiple extractions of carious teeth controlled bleeding. No postoperative sequelae occurred.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68-70
Number of pages3
JournalSpecial care in dentistry : official publication of the American Association of Hospital Dentists, the Academy of Dentistry for the Handicapped, and the American Society for Geriatric Dentistry
Volume11
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Primary Myelofibrosis
Tooth
Anemia
Hemorrhage
Myeloproliferative Disorders
Erythrocyte Transfusion
Tooth Extraction
Splenomegaly
Hematopoiesis
Blood Coagulation
Hemostatics
Therapeutics
Referral and Consultation
Bone Marrow
Pediatrics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

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title = "Idiopathic myelofibrosis: dental treatment considerations.",
abstract = "Idiopathic myelofibrosis is a myeloproliferative disorder of unknown origin. The bone marrow becomes fibrotic with an associated decrease in hematopoiesis resulting in anemia, bleeding problems, splenomegaly, and other secondary abnormalities. Although idiopathic myelofibrosis is usually diagnosed in middle age, there have been a few reports of the disorder in the pediatric population. This case report documents dental treatment considerations in a 6-year-old female with idiopathic myelofibrosis, severe anemia, and abnormal blood coagulation studies. The patient was successfully treated in a hospital after medical consultation, transfusion of packed red blood cells, and administration of prophylactic antibiotics. Local hemostatic measures following multiple extractions of carious teeth controlled bleeding. No postoperative sequelae occurred.",
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AU - Steelman, Robert

AU - Holmes, D.

AU - Cranston, R.

AU - Cupp, D.

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N2 - Idiopathic myelofibrosis is a myeloproliferative disorder of unknown origin. The bone marrow becomes fibrotic with an associated decrease in hematopoiesis resulting in anemia, bleeding problems, splenomegaly, and other secondary abnormalities. Although idiopathic myelofibrosis is usually diagnosed in middle age, there have been a few reports of the disorder in the pediatric population. This case report documents dental treatment considerations in a 6-year-old female with idiopathic myelofibrosis, severe anemia, and abnormal blood coagulation studies. The patient was successfully treated in a hospital after medical consultation, transfusion of packed red blood cells, and administration of prophylactic antibiotics. Local hemostatic measures following multiple extractions of carious teeth controlled bleeding. No postoperative sequelae occurred.

AB - Idiopathic myelofibrosis is a myeloproliferative disorder of unknown origin. The bone marrow becomes fibrotic with an associated decrease in hematopoiesis resulting in anemia, bleeding problems, splenomegaly, and other secondary abnormalities. Although idiopathic myelofibrosis is usually diagnosed in middle age, there have been a few reports of the disorder in the pediatric population. This case report documents dental treatment considerations in a 6-year-old female with idiopathic myelofibrosis, severe anemia, and abnormal blood coagulation studies. The patient was successfully treated in a hospital after medical consultation, transfusion of packed red blood cells, and administration of prophylactic antibiotics. Local hemostatic measures following multiple extractions of carious teeth controlled bleeding. No postoperative sequelae occurred.

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