Identifying a Relationship Between Physical Frailty and Heart Failure Symptoms

Quin Denfeld, Kerri Winters-Stone, James Mudd, Shirin O. Hiatt, Christopher Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND:: Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome associated with significant symptom burden; however, our understanding of the relationship between symptoms and physical frailty in HF is limited. OBJECTIVE:: The aim of this study was to quantify associations between symptoms and physical frailty in adults with HF. METHODS:: A sample of adults with symptomatic HF were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Physical symptoms were measured with the HF Somatic Perception Scale–Dyspnea subscale, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and the Brief Pain Inventory short form. Affective symptoms were measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Brief Symptom Inventory–Anxiety scale. Physical frailty was assessed according to the Frailty Phenotype Criteria: shrinking, weakness, slowness, physical exhaustion, and low physical activity. Comparative statistics and generalized linear modeling were used to quantify associations between symptoms and physical frailty, controlling for Seattle HF Model projected 1-year survival. RESULTS:: The mean age of the sample (n = 49) was 57.4 ± 9.7 years, 67% were male, 92% had New York Heart Association class III/IV HF, and 67% had nonischemic HF. Physically frail participants had more than twice the level of dyspnea (P < .001), 75% worse wake disturbances (P < .001), and 76% worse depressive symptoms (P = .003) compared with those who were not physically frail. There were no differences in pain or anxiety. CONCLUSIONS:: Physically frail adults with HF have considerably worse dyspnea, wake disturbances, and depression. Targeting physical frailty may help identify and improve physical and affective symptoms in HF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Nursing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 28 2017

Fingerprint

Heart Failure
Affective Symptoms
Dyspnea
Depression
Pain
Anxiety
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Phenotype
Equipment and Supplies
Survival
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Identifying a Relationship Between Physical Frailty and Heart Failure Symptoms. / Denfeld, Quin; Winters-Stone, Kerri; Mudd, James; Hiatt, Shirin O.; Lee, Christopher.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 28.03.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{436e12facffb4bc0a94a9260213ee5cf,
title = "Identifying a Relationship Between Physical Frailty and Heart Failure Symptoms",
abstract = "BACKGROUND:: Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome associated with significant symptom burden; however, our understanding of the relationship between symptoms and physical frailty in HF is limited. OBJECTIVE:: The aim of this study was to quantify associations between symptoms and physical frailty in adults with HF. METHODS:: A sample of adults with symptomatic HF were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Physical symptoms were measured with the HF Somatic Perception Scale–Dyspnea subscale, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and the Brief Pain Inventory short form. Affective symptoms were measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Brief Symptom Inventory–Anxiety scale. Physical frailty was assessed according to the Frailty Phenotype Criteria: shrinking, weakness, slowness, physical exhaustion, and low physical activity. Comparative statistics and generalized linear modeling were used to quantify associations between symptoms and physical frailty, controlling for Seattle HF Model projected 1-year survival. RESULTS:: The mean age of the sample (n = 49) was 57.4 ± 9.7 years, 67{\%} were male, 92{\%} had New York Heart Association class III/IV HF, and 67{\%} had nonischemic HF. Physically frail participants had more than twice the level of dyspnea (P < .001), 75{\%} worse wake disturbances (P < .001), and 76{\%} worse depressive symptoms (P = .003) compared with those who were not physically frail. There were no differences in pain or anxiety. CONCLUSIONS:: Physically frail adults with HF have considerably worse dyspnea, wake disturbances, and depression. Targeting physical frailty may help identify and improve physical and affective symptoms in HF.",
author = "Quin Denfeld and Kerri Winters-Stone and James Mudd and Hiatt, {Shirin O.} and Christopher Lee",
year = "2017",
month = "3",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1097/JCN.0000000000000408",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing",
issn = "0889-4655",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Identifying a Relationship Between Physical Frailty and Heart Failure Symptoms

AU - Denfeld, Quin

AU - Winters-Stone, Kerri

AU - Mudd, James

AU - Hiatt, Shirin O.

AU - Lee, Christopher

PY - 2017/3/28

Y1 - 2017/3/28

N2 - BACKGROUND:: Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome associated with significant symptom burden; however, our understanding of the relationship between symptoms and physical frailty in HF is limited. OBJECTIVE:: The aim of this study was to quantify associations between symptoms and physical frailty in adults with HF. METHODS:: A sample of adults with symptomatic HF were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Physical symptoms were measured with the HF Somatic Perception Scale–Dyspnea subscale, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and the Brief Pain Inventory short form. Affective symptoms were measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Brief Symptom Inventory–Anxiety scale. Physical frailty was assessed according to the Frailty Phenotype Criteria: shrinking, weakness, slowness, physical exhaustion, and low physical activity. Comparative statistics and generalized linear modeling were used to quantify associations between symptoms and physical frailty, controlling for Seattle HF Model projected 1-year survival. RESULTS:: The mean age of the sample (n = 49) was 57.4 ± 9.7 years, 67% were male, 92% had New York Heart Association class III/IV HF, and 67% had nonischemic HF. Physically frail participants had more than twice the level of dyspnea (P < .001), 75% worse wake disturbances (P < .001), and 76% worse depressive symptoms (P = .003) compared with those who were not physically frail. There were no differences in pain or anxiety. CONCLUSIONS:: Physically frail adults with HF have considerably worse dyspnea, wake disturbances, and depression. Targeting physical frailty may help identify and improve physical and affective symptoms in HF.

AB - BACKGROUND:: Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome associated with significant symptom burden; however, our understanding of the relationship between symptoms and physical frailty in HF is limited. OBJECTIVE:: The aim of this study was to quantify associations between symptoms and physical frailty in adults with HF. METHODS:: A sample of adults with symptomatic HF were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Physical symptoms were measured with the HF Somatic Perception Scale–Dyspnea subscale, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and the Brief Pain Inventory short form. Affective symptoms were measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Brief Symptom Inventory–Anxiety scale. Physical frailty was assessed according to the Frailty Phenotype Criteria: shrinking, weakness, slowness, physical exhaustion, and low physical activity. Comparative statistics and generalized linear modeling were used to quantify associations between symptoms and physical frailty, controlling for Seattle HF Model projected 1-year survival. RESULTS:: The mean age of the sample (n = 49) was 57.4 ± 9.7 years, 67% were male, 92% had New York Heart Association class III/IV HF, and 67% had nonischemic HF. Physically frail participants had more than twice the level of dyspnea (P < .001), 75% worse wake disturbances (P < .001), and 76% worse depressive symptoms (P = .003) compared with those who were not physically frail. There were no differences in pain or anxiety. CONCLUSIONS:: Physically frail adults with HF have considerably worse dyspnea, wake disturbances, and depression. Targeting physical frailty may help identify and improve physical and affective symptoms in HF.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85016400945&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85016400945&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/JCN.0000000000000408

DO - 10.1097/JCN.0000000000000408

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing

JF - Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing

SN - 0889-4655

ER -