How potent is potent? Evaluation of sexual function and bother in men who report potency after treatment for prostate cancer

Data from CaPSURE

Matthew R. Cooperberg, Theresa Koppie, Deborah P. Lubeck, John Ye, Gary D. Grossfeld, Shilpa S. Mehta, Peter R. Carroll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. To characterize the association between potency and comprehensive sexual function. The accurate assessment of sexual function is critical for the evaluation of outcomes after treatment of prostate cancer. The assessments of potency typically used in this context, however, may be oversimplified. Methods. CaPSURE is a large, observational database of men with prostate cancer. Participants complete health-related quality-of-life questionnaires, including the University of California, Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index, every 6 months after treatment. A total of 5135 men completed at least one questionnaire and did not use medications for erectile function. The men were categorized as potent or impotent based on their ability to have erections and/or intercourse in the prior 4 weeks. Using the remaining questions on the Prostate Cancer Index, sexual function and bother scores were calculated for each group. Results. Of the 5135 men, 27.4% were potent. The mean sexual function scores were 56 and 13 for potent and impotent men, respectively (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)190-196
Number of pages7
JournalUrology
Volume61
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Prostatic Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Los Angeles
Quality of Life
Databases
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Cooperberg, M. R., Koppie, T., Lubeck, D. P., Ye, J., Grossfeld, G. D., Mehta, S. S., & Carroll, P. R. (2003). How potent is potent? Evaluation of sexual function and bother in men who report potency after treatment for prostate cancer: Data from CaPSURE. Urology, 61(1), 190-196. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0090-4295(02)02118-0

How potent is potent? Evaluation of sexual function and bother in men who report potency after treatment for prostate cancer : Data from CaPSURE. / Cooperberg, Matthew R.; Koppie, Theresa; Lubeck, Deborah P.; Ye, John; Grossfeld, Gary D.; Mehta, Shilpa S.; Carroll, Peter R.

In: Urology, Vol. 61, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 190-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cooperberg, Matthew R. ; Koppie, Theresa ; Lubeck, Deborah P. ; Ye, John ; Grossfeld, Gary D. ; Mehta, Shilpa S. ; Carroll, Peter R. / How potent is potent? Evaluation of sexual function and bother in men who report potency after treatment for prostate cancer : Data from CaPSURE. In: Urology. 2003 ; Vol. 61, No. 1. pp. 190-196.
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