How micro is microdissection? Laser removal of stratum corneum of skin to expose the epidermal battery

Steven Jacques, Felix E. Ejeckam, Frank K. Tittel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How micro is laser microdissection? This study compared the spatial resolution of laser microdissection achieved by two laser systems: the ArF excimer laser which is strongly absorbed by tissue protein, and the Er:YAG laser which is strongly absorbed by tissue water. Both lasers penetrate tissue only a couple microns and are suitable for laser microdissection, and in this report the lasers ablated the outer dead-cell layer of the skin called the stratum corneum. The study involved dorsal skin sites on 8 rats for the ArF excimer and 10 rats for the Er:YAG. Ag/AgCl-gel electrodes were used to measure the passive DC resistance (R) and the active DC voltage (V) of skin sites which had received increasing numbers of ablative laser pulses (9 mJ/pulse, Er:YAG; 48 mJ/pulse, ArF excimer). About 8 pulses were required before a sudden drop in Ra and a sudden rise in V was observed. The R dropped from 4 ± 0.2 (18) Mohm down to 1.5 ± 0.2 (18) Mohm; mean ± standard deviation (number of skin sites). The V was initially -56 ± 5 mV, then dropped to -3 ± 0.4 mV after laser ablation penetrated and destroyed the battery. The Er:YAG laser required 8.3 ± 1.5 pulses to achieve 50% of the full change in R and V; the ArF excimer laser required 76 ± 2 pulses. The changes in R and V per depth of tissue ablated were identical for the two lasers, despite their distinct differences in absorbing chromophore and efficiency of ablation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
PublisherPubl by Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers
Pages23-33
Number of pages11
Volume1882
ISBN (Print)0819411094
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes
EventLaser-Tissue Interaction IV - Los Angeles, CA, USA
Duration: Jan 18 1993Jan 20 1993

Other

OtherLaser-Tissue Interaction IV
CityLos Angeles, CA, USA
Period1/18/931/20/93

Fingerprint

Microdissection
cornea
strata
electric batteries
Skin
Lasers
lasers
pulses
Laser pulses
Tissue
excimers
Excimer lasers
excimer lasers
yttrium-aluminum garnet
rats
YAG lasers
Rats
direct current
Laser ablation
Chromophores

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Jacques, S., Ejeckam, F. E., & Tittel, F. K. (1993). How micro is microdissection? Laser removal of stratum corneum of skin to expose the epidermal battery. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 1882, pp. 23-33). Publ by Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

How micro is microdissection? Laser removal of stratum corneum of skin to expose the epidermal battery. / Jacques, Steven; Ejeckam, Felix E.; Tittel, Frank K.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 1882 Publ by Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, 1993. p. 23-33.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Jacques, S, Ejeckam, FE & Tittel, FK 1993, How micro is microdissection? Laser removal of stratum corneum of skin to expose the epidermal battery. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 1882, Publ by Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, pp. 23-33, Laser-Tissue Interaction IV, Los Angeles, CA, USA, 1/18/93.
Jacques S, Ejeckam FE, Tittel FK. How micro is microdissection? Laser removal of stratum corneum of skin to expose the epidermal battery. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 1882. Publ by Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. 1993. p. 23-33
Jacques, Steven ; Ejeckam, Felix E. ; Tittel, Frank K. / How micro is microdissection? Laser removal of stratum corneum of skin to expose the epidermal battery. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 1882 Publ by Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, 1993. pp. 23-33
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