Hepatotoxicity associated with the use of white flood, a nutritional supplement

Stanley Martin Cohen, Elizabeth Heywood, Anjana Pillai, Joseph Ahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies are used by a large percentage of the US population. These agents are poorly regulated. Several of these agents have been associated with hepatotoxicity. We present the frst case report of cholestatic hepatitis attributed to the use of White Flood, an herbal muscle-building supplement. A patient using this agent presented with signifcant cholestatic hepatitis. A full serologic and imaging evaluation failed to reveal any other likely sources. His liver tests normalized with removal of the suspected offending agent. Evidence to support White Flood as the causative agent include a correct temporal relationship, lack of other likely etiology after extensive evaluation, and resolution of symptoms after withdrawal of this agent. Clinicians should be aware that this supplement may have the potential to induce cholestatic hepatitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-47
Number of pages3
JournalPractical Gastroenterology
Volume36
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hepatitis
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome
Symptom Assessment
Proxy
Complementary Therapies
Muscles
Liver
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Hepatotoxicity associated with the use of white flood, a nutritional supplement. / Cohen, Stanley Martin; Heywood, Elizabeth; Pillai, Anjana; Ahn, Joseph.

In: Practical Gastroenterology, Vol. 36, No. 10, 10.2012, p. 45-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cohen, Stanley Martin ; Heywood, Elizabeth ; Pillai, Anjana ; Ahn, Joseph. / Hepatotoxicity associated with the use of white flood, a nutritional supplement. In: Practical Gastroenterology. 2012 ; Vol. 36, No. 10. pp. 45-47.
@article{acaa63713d424d1ea6962f416ea41a31,
title = "Hepatotoxicity associated with the use of white flood, a nutritional supplement",
abstract = "Complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies are used by a large percentage of the US population. These agents are poorly regulated. Several of these agents have been associated with hepatotoxicity. We present the frst case report of cholestatic hepatitis attributed to the use of White Flood, an herbal muscle-building supplement. A patient using this agent presented with signifcant cholestatic hepatitis. A full serologic and imaging evaluation failed to reveal any other likely sources. His liver tests normalized with removal of the suspected offending agent. Evidence to support White Flood as the causative agent include a correct temporal relationship, lack of other likely etiology after extensive evaluation, and resolution of symptoms after withdrawal of this agent. Clinicians should be aware that this supplement may have the potential to induce cholestatic hepatitis.",
author = "Cohen, {Stanley Martin} and Elizabeth Heywood and Anjana Pillai and Joseph Ahn",
year = "2012",
month = "10",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "36",
pages = "45--47",
journal = "Practical Gastroenterology",
issn = "0277-4208",
publisher = "Shugar Publishing Inc.",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hepatotoxicity associated with the use of white flood, a nutritional supplement

AU - Cohen, Stanley Martin

AU - Heywood, Elizabeth

AU - Pillai, Anjana

AU - Ahn, Joseph

PY - 2012/10

Y1 - 2012/10

N2 - Complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies are used by a large percentage of the US population. These agents are poorly regulated. Several of these agents have been associated with hepatotoxicity. We present the frst case report of cholestatic hepatitis attributed to the use of White Flood, an herbal muscle-building supplement. A patient using this agent presented with signifcant cholestatic hepatitis. A full serologic and imaging evaluation failed to reveal any other likely sources. His liver tests normalized with removal of the suspected offending agent. Evidence to support White Flood as the causative agent include a correct temporal relationship, lack of other likely etiology after extensive evaluation, and resolution of symptoms after withdrawal of this agent. Clinicians should be aware that this supplement may have the potential to induce cholestatic hepatitis.

AB - Complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies are used by a large percentage of the US population. These agents are poorly regulated. Several of these agents have been associated with hepatotoxicity. We present the frst case report of cholestatic hepatitis attributed to the use of White Flood, an herbal muscle-building supplement. A patient using this agent presented with signifcant cholestatic hepatitis. A full serologic and imaging evaluation failed to reveal any other likely sources. His liver tests normalized with removal of the suspected offending agent. Evidence to support White Flood as the causative agent include a correct temporal relationship, lack of other likely etiology after extensive evaluation, and resolution of symptoms after withdrawal of this agent. Clinicians should be aware that this supplement may have the potential to induce cholestatic hepatitis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84868230443&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84868230443&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84868230443

VL - 36

SP - 45

EP - 47

JO - Practical Gastroenterology

JF - Practical Gastroenterology

SN - 0277-4208

IS - 10

ER -