Gender differences in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis develop during the induction of the immune response to encephalitogenic peptides

Bruce F. Bebo, Jeanette C. Schuster, Arthur A. Vandenbark, Halina Offner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) strikes women more often than men. Gender differences in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) parallel those seen in MS. We utilized the adoptive transfer model of EAE to determine the role of gender on the induction and effector phases of disease. PLP 139-151- sensitized spleen cells from female SJL mice were more effective at transferring disease than male cells. However, there were no gender differences in the frequency of PLP 139-151-specific T cells. PLP 139-151- specific female T cell lines induced more severe disease than male T cell lines. Disease severity was more strongly linked to the sex of the donor T cells, indicating that gender influences the immune response primarily during the induction phase.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)420-426
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Research
Volume52
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 1998

Keywords

  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Proteolipid protein
  • Sex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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