Future directions of therapy for GERD

M (Brian) Fennerty, Mark K. Ferguson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This book has been devoted to a critical appraisal of treatment options for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and failed anti-reflux therapy and has provided a physiologic basis for managing the postoperative syndromes associated with surgical anti-reflux therapy. In this final chapter, we would like to explore what we feel are future prospects for the various management options for patients with newly diagnosed, persistent, or recurrent GERD. Much of what we hypothesize is speculative but these thoughts are meant to encourage the reader to consider what we may be able to offer and how we might approach these patients in the near future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationManaging Failed Anti-Reflux Therapy
PublisherSpringer London
Pages181-185
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)1852339098, 9781852339098
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

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Gastroesophageal Reflux
Therapeutics
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Fennerty, M. B., & Ferguson, M. K. (2006). Future directions of therapy for GERD. In Managing Failed Anti-Reflux Therapy (pp. 181-185). Springer London. https://doi.org/10.1007/1-84628-011-7_16

Future directions of therapy for GERD. / Fennerty, M (Brian); Ferguson, Mark K.

Managing Failed Anti-Reflux Therapy. Springer London, 2006. p. 181-185.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Fennerty, MB & Ferguson, MK 2006, Future directions of therapy for GERD. in Managing Failed Anti-Reflux Therapy. Springer London, pp. 181-185. https://doi.org/10.1007/1-84628-011-7_16
Fennerty MB, Ferguson MK. Future directions of therapy for GERD. In Managing Failed Anti-Reflux Therapy. Springer London. 2006. p. 181-185 https://doi.org/10.1007/1-84628-011-7_16
Fennerty, M (Brian) ; Ferguson, Mark K. / Future directions of therapy for GERD. Managing Failed Anti-Reflux Therapy. Springer London, 2006. pp. 181-185
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