Exploring scholarship and the emergency medicine educator

A workforce study

Jaime Jordan, Wendy C. Coates, Samuel Clarke, Daniel P. Runde, Emilie Fowlkes, Jacqueline Kurth, Lalena Yarris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Recent literature calls for initiatives to improve the quality of education studies and support faculty in approaching educational problems in a scholarly manner. Understanding the emergency medicine (EM) educator workforce is a crucial precursor to developing policies to support educators and promote education scholarship in EM. This study aims to illuminate the current workforce model for the academic EM educator. Methods: Program leadership at EM training programs completed an online survey consisting of multiple choice, completion, and free-response type items. We calculated and reported descriptive statistics. Results: 112 programs participated. Mean number of core faculty/program: 16.02 ± 7.83 [14.53-17.5]. Mean number of faculty full-time equivalents (FTEs)/program dedicated to education is 6.92 ± 4.92 [5.87- 7.98], including (mean FTE): Vice chair for education (0.25); director of medical education (0.13); education fellowship director (0.2); residency program director (0.83); associate residency director (0.94); assistant residency director (1.1); medical student clerkship director (0.8); assistant/associate clerkship director (0.28); simulation fellowship director (0.11); simulation director (0.42); director of faculty development (0.13). Mean number of FTEs/program for education administrative support is 2.34 ± 1.1 [2.13-2.61]. Determination of clinical hours varied; 38.75% of programs had personnel with education research expertise. Conclusion: Education faculty represent about 43% of the core faculty workforce. Many programs do not have the full spectrum of education leadership roles and educational faculty divide their time among multiple important academic roles. Clinical requirements vary. Many departments lack personnel with expertise in education research. This information may inform interventions to promote education scholarship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-168
Number of pages6
JournalWestern Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Emergency Medicine
Education
Internship and Residency
Medical Education
Medical Students
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Exploring scholarship and the emergency medicine educator : A workforce study. / Jordan, Jaime; Coates, Wendy C.; Clarke, Samuel; Runde, Daniel P.; Fowlkes, Emilie; Kurth, Jacqueline; Yarris, Lalena.

In: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 163-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jordan, Jaime ; Coates, Wendy C. ; Clarke, Samuel ; Runde, Daniel P. ; Fowlkes, Emilie ; Kurth, Jacqueline ; Yarris, Lalena. / Exploring scholarship and the emergency medicine educator : A workforce study. In: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 163-168.
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