Estrogen and Sequential movement

Peggy J. Jennings, Jeri S. Janowsky, Eric Orwoll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Normal movement depends in part on the brain's ability to produce and use dopamine, which regulates basal ganglia function. Behavioral, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological data suggest that the basal ganglia are critical for the performance of sequential movement. Dopaminergic function is modulated by estrogen in animals and in humans. To test the hypothesis that estrogen modulates sequential movement, this study measured the reaction time (RT) and movement time (MT) of 15 women and 10 men in a choice RT task with sequential responses. Higher levels of estradiol in women's blood were associated with faster total movement time (RT plus MT). Testosterone levels in women's blood were not associated with keypressing performance. Hormone levels in men's blood were unrelated to keypressing performance. These results suggest that women's motor performance was affected by hormone levels, and that estrogen may interact with dopaminergic function in women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)154-159
Number of pages6
JournalBehavioral Neuroscience
Volume112
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Estrogens
Basal Ganglia
Hormones
Testosterone
Estradiol
Dopamine
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Estrogen and Sequential movement. / Jennings, Peggy J.; Janowsky, Jeri S.; Orwoll, Eric.

In: Behavioral Neuroscience, Vol. 112, No. 1, 1998, p. 154-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jennings, Peggy J. ; Janowsky, Jeri S. ; Orwoll, Eric. / Estrogen and Sequential movement. In: Behavioral Neuroscience. 1998 ; Vol. 112, No. 1. pp. 154-159.
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