Epithelial cell surfaces induce Salmonella proteins required for bacterial adherence and invasion

B. Brett Finlay, Fred Heffron, Stanley Falkow

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Abstract

Salmonella bacteria are capable ofentering (invading) and multiplying within eukaryotic cells. Stable adherence to and invasion of epithelial cells by S. choleraesuis and S. typhimurium were found to require de novo synthesis of several new bacterial proteins. This inducible event appears to be a coordinately regulated system dependent on trypsin- and neuraminidase-sensitive structures present on the epithelial cell surface. Mutants of S. choleraesuis and S. typhimurium were unable to synthesize these proteins and did not stably adhere to nor invade eukaryotic cells. Two such S. typhimurium mutants were avirulent in mice, an indication that these proteins are required for Salmonella virulence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)940-943
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume243
Issue number4893
Publication statusPublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Cite this

Finlay, B. B., Heffron, F., & Falkow, S. (1989). Epithelial cell surfaces induce Salmonella proteins required for bacterial adherence and invasion. Science, 243(4893), 940-943.