Encapsidation of truncated human hepatitis b virus genomes through trans-complementation of the core protein and polymerase

Pei-Wen Chiang, Cheng Po Hu, Tsung Sheng Su, Szecheng J. Lo, Ming Huey H Chu, Heinz Schaller, Chungming Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mutational analyses and complementation tests were used to analyze the strategy of packaging and of replication of human hepatitis B virus (HBV). By creating new restriction enzyme sites and by varying the genome length of HBV mutants, we identified that the mutated genomes could be encapsidated through trans-complementation of the polymerase and/or core protein. This study demonstrates that the polymerase of HBV, similar to that of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), is synthesized de novo instead of through a core-polymerase fusion protein. The results also indicate that both the polymerase and the core protein can be supplied in trans during viral packaging, and that the complementation is not due to recombination between the cotransfected plasmids. Furthermore, HBV genome deleted down to 2.4 kb is still able to be encapsidated, as measured by the endogenous polymerase reaction. Taken together, these results provide a basis for using HBV as a vector to deliver foreign genes into hepatocytes and for defining the location of the packaging signal on the HBV genome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-361
Number of pages7
JournalVirology
Volume176
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hepatitis Viruses
Hepatitis B virus
Genome
Proteins
Product Packaging
Duck Hepatitis B Viruses
Genetic Complementation Test
Virus Assembly
Genetic Recombination
Hepatocytes
Plasmids
Enzymes
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Chiang, P-W., Hu, C. P., Su, T. S., Lo, S. J., Chu, M. H. H., Schaller, H., & Chang, C. (1990). Encapsidation of truncated human hepatitis b virus genomes through trans-complementation of the core protein and polymerase. Virology, 176(2), 355-361. https://doi.org/10.1016/0042-6822(90)90005-C

Encapsidation of truncated human hepatitis b virus genomes through trans-complementation of the core protein and polymerase. / Chiang, Pei-Wen; Hu, Cheng Po; Su, Tsung Sheng; Lo, Szecheng J.; Chu, Ming Huey H; Schaller, Heinz; Chang, Chungming.

In: Virology, Vol. 176, No. 2, 1990, p. 355-361.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chiang, Pei-Wen ; Hu, Cheng Po ; Su, Tsung Sheng ; Lo, Szecheng J. ; Chu, Ming Huey H ; Schaller, Heinz ; Chang, Chungming. / Encapsidation of truncated human hepatitis b virus genomes through trans-complementation of the core protein and polymerase. In: Virology. 1990 ; Vol. 176, No. 2. pp. 355-361.
@article{b2ebd4cac81d4c628ad11d9fc351e8c9,
title = "Encapsidation of truncated human hepatitis b virus genomes through trans-complementation of the core protein and polymerase",
abstract = "Mutational analyses and complementation tests were used to analyze the strategy of packaging and of replication of human hepatitis B virus (HBV). By creating new restriction enzyme sites and by varying the genome length of HBV mutants, we identified that the mutated genomes could be encapsidated through trans-complementation of the polymerase and/or core protein. This study demonstrates that the polymerase of HBV, similar to that of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), is synthesized de novo instead of through a core-polymerase fusion protein. The results also indicate that both the polymerase and the core protein can be supplied in trans during viral packaging, and that the complementation is not due to recombination between the cotransfected plasmids. Furthermore, HBV genome deleted down to 2.4 kb is still able to be encapsidated, as measured by the endogenous polymerase reaction. Taken together, these results provide a basis for using HBV as a vector to deliver foreign genes into hepatocytes and for defining the location of the packaging signal on the HBV genome.",
author = "Pei-Wen Chiang and Hu, {Cheng Po} and Su, {Tsung Sheng} and Lo, {Szecheng J.} and Chu, {Ming Huey H} and Heinz Schaller and Chungming Chang",
year = "1990",
doi = "10.1016/0042-6822(90)90005-C",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "176",
pages = "355--361",
journal = "Virology",
issn = "0042-6822",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Encapsidation of truncated human hepatitis b virus genomes through trans-complementation of the core protein and polymerase

AU - Chiang, Pei-Wen

AU - Hu, Cheng Po

AU - Su, Tsung Sheng

AU - Lo, Szecheng J.

AU - Chu, Ming Huey H

AU - Schaller, Heinz

AU - Chang, Chungming

PY - 1990

Y1 - 1990

N2 - Mutational analyses and complementation tests were used to analyze the strategy of packaging and of replication of human hepatitis B virus (HBV). By creating new restriction enzyme sites and by varying the genome length of HBV mutants, we identified that the mutated genomes could be encapsidated through trans-complementation of the polymerase and/or core protein. This study demonstrates that the polymerase of HBV, similar to that of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), is synthesized de novo instead of through a core-polymerase fusion protein. The results also indicate that both the polymerase and the core protein can be supplied in trans during viral packaging, and that the complementation is not due to recombination between the cotransfected plasmids. Furthermore, HBV genome deleted down to 2.4 kb is still able to be encapsidated, as measured by the endogenous polymerase reaction. Taken together, these results provide a basis for using HBV as a vector to deliver foreign genes into hepatocytes and for defining the location of the packaging signal on the HBV genome.

AB - Mutational analyses and complementation tests were used to analyze the strategy of packaging and of replication of human hepatitis B virus (HBV). By creating new restriction enzyme sites and by varying the genome length of HBV mutants, we identified that the mutated genomes could be encapsidated through trans-complementation of the polymerase and/or core protein. This study demonstrates that the polymerase of HBV, similar to that of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), is synthesized de novo instead of through a core-polymerase fusion protein. The results also indicate that both the polymerase and the core protein can be supplied in trans during viral packaging, and that the complementation is not due to recombination between the cotransfected plasmids. Furthermore, HBV genome deleted down to 2.4 kb is still able to be encapsidated, as measured by the endogenous polymerase reaction. Taken together, these results provide a basis for using HBV as a vector to deliver foreign genes into hepatocytes and for defining the location of the packaging signal on the HBV genome.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025284634&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025284634&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0042-6822(90)90005-C

DO - 10.1016/0042-6822(90)90005-C

M3 - Article

C2 - 2345959

AN - SCOPUS:0025284634

VL - 176

SP - 355

EP - 361

JO - Virology

JF - Virology

SN - 0042-6822

IS - 2

ER -