Electroretinographic findings in transplant chorioretinopathy

Brian T. Chan-Kai, Steven Yeh, Richard Weleber, Peter J. Francis, Grazyna Adamus, S. Robert Witherspoon, Andreas (Andy) Lauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: Transplant chorioretinopathy is a rare complication following solid organ or bone marrow transplantation and can result in severe vision loss. This series presents electroretinogram (ERG) results in patients with this condition. Methods: Patients who presented with bilateral vision loss following bone marrow or solid organ transplantation were identified. A complete ophthalmologic examination, fundus photography, and fluorescein angiography (FA) were performed. Full-field ERG was obtained in all patients and a multifocal ERG (mfERG) was obtained in two patients. Results: Four patients were identified. All patients had bilateral vision loss and displayed a characteristic pattern of mottled hyperfluorescence on FA. Three patients developed progressive vision loss ranging from 20/60 to hand motions whereas one retained 20/40 vision. All patients exhibited moderate to severe cone dysfunction, while the degree of rod abnormalities was varied. Two patients with severe cone dysfunction showed mild clinical changes initially, but later developed progressive vision loss and chorioretinal atrophy. Conclusion: Transplant chorioretinopathy patients undergoing ERG testing show cone dysfunction with a variable degree of rod dysfunction. ERG abnormalities preceded the visual acuity and clinical changes in two patients, suggesting that ERG may be a helpful predictor of the clinical course in this rare disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)777-783
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Ophthalmology
Volume4
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Transplants
Fluorescein Angiography
Photography
Organ Transplantation
Rare Diseases
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Visual Acuity
Atrophy
Hand
Bone Marrow

Keywords

  • Chorioretinopathy
  • Electroretinogram
  • ERG
  • mfERG
  • Transplant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Chan-Kai, B. T., Yeh, S., Weleber, R., Francis, P. J., Adamus, G., Witherspoon, S. R., & Lauer, A. A. (2010). Electroretinographic findings in transplant chorioretinopathy. Clinical Ophthalmology, 4(1), 777-783.

Electroretinographic findings in transplant chorioretinopathy. / Chan-Kai, Brian T.; Yeh, Steven; Weleber, Richard; Francis, Peter J.; Adamus, Grazyna; Witherspoon, S. Robert; Lauer, Andreas (Andy).

In: Clinical Ophthalmology, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2010, p. 777-783.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chan-Kai, BT, Yeh, S, Weleber, R, Francis, PJ, Adamus, G, Witherspoon, SR & Lauer, AA 2010, 'Electroretinographic findings in transplant chorioretinopathy', Clinical Ophthalmology, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 777-783.
Chan-Kai BT, Yeh S, Weleber R, Francis PJ, Adamus G, Witherspoon SR et al. Electroretinographic findings in transplant chorioretinopathy. Clinical Ophthalmology. 2010;4(1):777-783.
Chan-Kai, Brian T. ; Yeh, Steven ; Weleber, Richard ; Francis, Peter J. ; Adamus, Grazyna ; Witherspoon, S. Robert ; Lauer, Andreas (Andy). / Electroretinographic findings in transplant chorioretinopathy. In: Clinical Ophthalmology. 2010 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 777-783.
@article{1a43834e81a641448201a369a6379d51,
title = "Electroretinographic findings in transplant chorioretinopathy",
abstract = "Aim: Transplant chorioretinopathy is a rare complication following solid organ or bone marrow transplantation and can result in severe vision loss. This series presents electroretinogram (ERG) results in patients with this condition. Methods: Patients who presented with bilateral vision loss following bone marrow or solid organ transplantation were identified. A complete ophthalmologic examination, fundus photography, and fluorescein angiography (FA) were performed. Full-field ERG was obtained in all patients and a multifocal ERG (mfERG) was obtained in two patients. Results: Four patients were identified. All patients had bilateral vision loss and displayed a characteristic pattern of mottled hyperfluorescence on FA. Three patients developed progressive vision loss ranging from 20/60 to hand motions whereas one retained 20/40 vision. All patients exhibited moderate to severe cone dysfunction, while the degree of rod abnormalities was varied. Two patients with severe cone dysfunction showed mild clinical changes initially, but later developed progressive vision loss and chorioretinal atrophy. Conclusion: Transplant chorioretinopathy patients undergoing ERG testing show cone dysfunction with a variable degree of rod dysfunction. ERG abnormalities preceded the visual acuity and clinical changes in two patients, suggesting that ERG may be a helpful predictor of the clinical course in this rare disease.",
keywords = "Chorioretinopathy, Electroretinogram, ERG, mfERG, Transplant",
author = "Chan-Kai, {Brian T.} and Steven Yeh and Richard Weleber and Francis, {Peter J.} and Grazyna Adamus and Witherspoon, {S. Robert} and Lauer, {Andreas (Andy)}",
year = "2010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
pages = "777--783",
journal = "Clinical Ophthalmology",
issn = "1177-5467",
publisher = "Dove Medical Press Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Electroretinographic findings in transplant chorioretinopathy

AU - Chan-Kai, Brian T.

AU - Yeh, Steven

AU - Weleber, Richard

AU - Francis, Peter J.

AU - Adamus, Grazyna

AU - Witherspoon, S. Robert

AU - Lauer, Andreas (Andy)

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Aim: Transplant chorioretinopathy is a rare complication following solid organ or bone marrow transplantation and can result in severe vision loss. This series presents electroretinogram (ERG) results in patients with this condition. Methods: Patients who presented with bilateral vision loss following bone marrow or solid organ transplantation were identified. A complete ophthalmologic examination, fundus photography, and fluorescein angiography (FA) were performed. Full-field ERG was obtained in all patients and a multifocal ERG (mfERG) was obtained in two patients. Results: Four patients were identified. All patients had bilateral vision loss and displayed a characteristic pattern of mottled hyperfluorescence on FA. Three patients developed progressive vision loss ranging from 20/60 to hand motions whereas one retained 20/40 vision. All patients exhibited moderate to severe cone dysfunction, while the degree of rod abnormalities was varied. Two patients with severe cone dysfunction showed mild clinical changes initially, but later developed progressive vision loss and chorioretinal atrophy. Conclusion: Transplant chorioretinopathy patients undergoing ERG testing show cone dysfunction with a variable degree of rod dysfunction. ERG abnormalities preceded the visual acuity and clinical changes in two patients, suggesting that ERG may be a helpful predictor of the clinical course in this rare disease.

AB - Aim: Transplant chorioretinopathy is a rare complication following solid organ or bone marrow transplantation and can result in severe vision loss. This series presents electroretinogram (ERG) results in patients with this condition. Methods: Patients who presented with bilateral vision loss following bone marrow or solid organ transplantation were identified. A complete ophthalmologic examination, fundus photography, and fluorescein angiography (FA) were performed. Full-field ERG was obtained in all patients and a multifocal ERG (mfERG) was obtained in two patients. Results: Four patients were identified. All patients had bilateral vision loss and displayed a characteristic pattern of mottled hyperfluorescence on FA. Three patients developed progressive vision loss ranging from 20/60 to hand motions whereas one retained 20/40 vision. All patients exhibited moderate to severe cone dysfunction, while the degree of rod abnormalities was varied. Two patients with severe cone dysfunction showed mild clinical changes initially, but later developed progressive vision loss and chorioretinal atrophy. Conclusion: Transplant chorioretinopathy patients undergoing ERG testing show cone dysfunction with a variable degree of rod dysfunction. ERG abnormalities preceded the visual acuity and clinical changes in two patients, suggesting that ERG may be a helpful predictor of the clinical course in this rare disease.

KW - Chorioretinopathy

KW - Electroretinogram

KW - ERG

KW - mfERG

KW - Transplant

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77956128485&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77956128485&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:77956128485

VL - 4

SP - 777

EP - 783

JO - Clinical Ophthalmology

JF - Clinical Ophthalmology

SN - 1177-5467

IS - 1

ER -