Effects of blockade of brain angiotensin II receptors in conscious, sodium-deprived dogs.

Virginia Brooks, I. A. Reid

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Abstract

The present studies were designed to evaluate the physiological significance of the actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) on the brain. The effects of blockade of brain ANG II receptors by intracarotid or intravertebral infusions of saralasin were studied in conscious dogs with high circulating ANG II levels (142 +/- 16 pg/ml) due to a low-sodium diet. Three doses of saralasin were infused into each pair of arteries and intravenously: 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1. Saralasin produced dose-related decreases in arterial pressure during infusion into the carotid or vertebral arteries, confirming that ANG II maintains arterial pressure during sodium deficiency. However, intravenous saralasin administration decreased pressure to a similar degree, suggesting that the hypotensive effect was due to recirculation of saralasin, rather than to blockade of a central action of circulating ANG II. Heart rate was not altered by infusion of saralasin by any route. Saralasin administration also caused a dose-dependent increase in plasma renin activity and plasma ANG II concentration. However, because the increases produced by intracarotid or intravertebral saralasin did not differ from the increase produced by intravenous infusion, these results do not provide evidence that renin release is modulated by a central action of ANG II during sodium deficiency. Plasma corticosteroid levels were reduced (2.4 +/- 0.5 to 1.4 +/- 0.2 micrograms/dl, P less than 0.05) by intravenous infusion of the highest dose of saralasin, but neither intracarotid nor intravertebral saralasin infusion altered plasma corticosteroid concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe American journal of physiology
Volume245
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Saralasin
Angiotensin Receptors
Sodium
Dogs
Angiotensin II
Brain
Renin
Intravenous Infusions
Arterial Pressure
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Sodium-Restricted Diet
Vertebral Artery
Carotid Arteries
Intravenous Administration
Arteries
Heart Rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Effects of blockade of brain angiotensin II receptors in conscious, sodium-deprived dogs. / Brooks, Virginia; Reid, I. A.

In: The American journal of physiology, Vol. 245, No. 6, 12.1983.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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