Effects of amplitude cueing on postural responses and preparatory cortical activity of people with Parkinson disease

Beth A. Smith, Jesse V. Jacobs, Fay Horak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Persons with Parkinson disease (PD) are unable to modify their postural responses, and show an associated increase in cortical preparatory activity for anticipated postural perturbations.1 In this study we asked whether participants with PD could modify their postural responses and cortical preparatory activity when cued to focus on increasing movement amplitude before a series of predictable postural perturbations.

Methods: Twelve participants with PD performed postural responses to 30 identical backward surface translations.We cued participants to focus on increasing movement amplitude, and examined the effects of cueing by measuring postural responses (center-of-pressure initial rate of change, automatic postural response stability, peak trunk flexion, peak ankle extension) and preparatory cortical activity (electroencephalographicmeasures of contingent negative variation, alpha and beta event-related desynchronization).

Results: Participants with PD modified their postural responses during the amplitude trials by increasing trunk flexion, slowing centerof- pressure initial rate of change, and decreasing automatic postural response stability. However, no significant differences in contingent negative variation amplitude or alpha or beta event-related desynchronization were observed with versus without amplitude cueing.

Discussion and Conclusions: Persons with PD were able to modify their feet-in-place postural responses with amplitude cueing. These changes were not associated with changes in cortical preparation during amplitude cue trials, suggesting that other regions or measures of brain function were responsible for changes in postural responses. Future studies are needed to determine the effects of longterm amplitude-cueing practice on cortical preparation and postural stability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-215
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neurologic Physical Therapy
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Parkinson Disease
Contingent Negative Variation
Pressure
Ankle
Cues
Foot
Brain

Keywords

  • Contingent negative variation
  • Cueing
  • Electroencephalography
  • Event-related desynchronization
  • Parkinson disease
  • Postural responses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Effects of amplitude cueing on postural responses and preparatory cortical activity of people with Parkinson disease. / Smith, Beth A.; Jacobs, Jesse V.; Horak, Fay.

In: Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy, Vol. 38, No. 4, 2014, p. 207-215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1c0ea46f1c2a473da1137fa96eb5e99e,
title = "Effects of amplitude cueing on postural responses and preparatory cortical activity of people with Parkinson disease",
abstract = "Background and Purpose: Persons with Parkinson disease (PD) are unable to modify their postural responses, and show an associated increase in cortical preparatory activity for anticipated postural perturbations.1 In this study we asked whether participants with PD could modify their postural responses and cortical preparatory activity when cued to focus on increasing movement amplitude before a series of predictable postural perturbations.Methods: Twelve participants with PD performed postural responses to 30 identical backward surface translations.We cued participants to focus on increasing movement amplitude, and examined the effects of cueing by measuring postural responses (center-of-pressure initial rate of change, automatic postural response stability, peak trunk flexion, peak ankle extension) and preparatory cortical activity (electroencephalographicmeasures of contingent negative variation, alpha and beta event-related desynchronization).Results: Participants with PD modified their postural responses during the amplitude trials by increasing trunk flexion, slowing centerof- pressure initial rate of change, and decreasing automatic postural response stability. However, no significant differences in contingent negative variation amplitude or alpha or beta event-related desynchronization were observed with versus without amplitude cueing.Discussion and Conclusions: Persons with PD were able to modify their feet-in-place postural responses with amplitude cueing. These changes were not associated with changes in cortical preparation during amplitude cue trials, suggesting that other regions or measures of brain function were responsible for changes in postural responses. Future studies are needed to determine the effects of longterm amplitude-cueing practice on cortical preparation and postural stability.",
keywords = "Contingent negative variation, Cueing, Electroencephalography, Event-related desynchronization, Parkinson disease, Postural responses",
author = "Smith, {Beth A.} and Jacobs, {Jesse V.} and Fay Horak",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1097/NPT.0000000000000058",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
pages = "207--215",
journal = "Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy",
issn = "1557-0576",
publisher = "American Physical Therapy Association",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of amplitude cueing on postural responses and preparatory cortical activity of people with Parkinson disease

AU - Smith, Beth A.

AU - Jacobs, Jesse V.

AU - Horak, Fay

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Background and Purpose: Persons with Parkinson disease (PD) are unable to modify their postural responses, and show an associated increase in cortical preparatory activity for anticipated postural perturbations.1 In this study we asked whether participants with PD could modify their postural responses and cortical preparatory activity when cued to focus on increasing movement amplitude before a series of predictable postural perturbations.Methods: Twelve participants with PD performed postural responses to 30 identical backward surface translations.We cued participants to focus on increasing movement amplitude, and examined the effects of cueing by measuring postural responses (center-of-pressure initial rate of change, automatic postural response stability, peak trunk flexion, peak ankle extension) and preparatory cortical activity (electroencephalographicmeasures of contingent negative variation, alpha and beta event-related desynchronization).Results: Participants with PD modified their postural responses during the amplitude trials by increasing trunk flexion, slowing centerof- pressure initial rate of change, and decreasing automatic postural response stability. However, no significant differences in contingent negative variation amplitude or alpha or beta event-related desynchronization were observed with versus without amplitude cueing.Discussion and Conclusions: Persons with PD were able to modify their feet-in-place postural responses with amplitude cueing. These changes were not associated with changes in cortical preparation during amplitude cue trials, suggesting that other regions or measures of brain function were responsible for changes in postural responses. Future studies are needed to determine the effects of longterm amplitude-cueing practice on cortical preparation and postural stability.

AB - Background and Purpose: Persons with Parkinson disease (PD) are unable to modify their postural responses, and show an associated increase in cortical preparatory activity for anticipated postural perturbations.1 In this study we asked whether participants with PD could modify their postural responses and cortical preparatory activity when cued to focus on increasing movement amplitude before a series of predictable postural perturbations.Methods: Twelve participants with PD performed postural responses to 30 identical backward surface translations.We cued participants to focus on increasing movement amplitude, and examined the effects of cueing by measuring postural responses (center-of-pressure initial rate of change, automatic postural response stability, peak trunk flexion, peak ankle extension) and preparatory cortical activity (electroencephalographicmeasures of contingent negative variation, alpha and beta event-related desynchronization).Results: Participants with PD modified their postural responses during the amplitude trials by increasing trunk flexion, slowing centerof- pressure initial rate of change, and decreasing automatic postural response stability. However, no significant differences in contingent negative variation amplitude or alpha or beta event-related desynchronization were observed with versus without amplitude cueing.Discussion and Conclusions: Persons with PD were able to modify their feet-in-place postural responses with amplitude cueing. These changes were not associated with changes in cortical preparation during amplitude cue trials, suggesting that other regions or measures of brain function were responsible for changes in postural responses. Future studies are needed to determine the effects of longterm amplitude-cueing practice on cortical preparation and postural stability.

KW - Contingent negative variation

KW - Cueing

KW - Electroencephalography

KW - Event-related desynchronization

KW - Parkinson disease

KW - Postural responses

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84913588687&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84913588687&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/NPT.0000000000000058

DO - 10.1097/NPT.0000000000000058

M3 - Article

VL - 38

SP - 207

EP - 215

JO - Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy

JF - Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy

SN - 1557-0576

IS - 4

ER -