Educational group visits for the management of chronic health conditions

A systematic review

Ana Quinones, Jeannette Richardson, Michele Freeman, Rongwei (Rochelle) Fu, Maya O'Neil, Makalapua Motu'apuaka, Devan Kansagara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Review the effectiveness of group visits (appointments of multiple patients) on quality of life, function, self-efficacy, utilization, and biophysical outcomes in randomized controlled trials of patients with chronic conditions. Methods: We searched MEDLINE®, Cochrane, CINAHL, and PsycINFO to January 2013 for English-language trials of educational group visits led by non-prescribing facilitators (e.g., peer educators). Results: We report on 80 arthritis/falls (n= 22), asthma/COPD (n= 10), CHF/hypertension (n= 12), diabetes (n= 29), multiple conditions (n= 4), and pain (n= 4) studies. We found moderate evidence of improved short-term self-efficacy in patients with arthritis (10 studies) and diabetes (10 studies). We found no consistent evidence of improved quality of life; however a moderately strong body of evidence suggests peer-led community-based programs might improve quality of life and utilization in patients with multiple chronic conditions. Meta-analyses found short- (14 studies; mean change HbA1c. = -0.27, CI. = -0.44, 0.11) and long-term (10 studies; mean change HbA1c. = -0.23, CI. = -0.44, -0.02) glycemic improvement. Conclusions: Group visits may improve self-efficacy and glycemic control. There was little consistent evidence of improved quality of life, functional status, or utilization. Practice implications: Group visits represent a reasonable alternative for educating patients with chronic illness, though varied participation/retention suggests they should not be the sole alternative.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-29
Number of pages27
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume95
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
Quality of Life
Health
Arthritis
MEDLINE
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Meta-Analysis
Appointments and Schedules
Chronic Disease
Language
Asthma
Randomized Controlled Trials
Hypertension
Pain

Keywords

  • Chronic disease
  • Chronic disease self-management
  • Group visits
  • Health education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Educational group visits for the management of chronic health conditions : A systematic review. / Quinones, Ana; Richardson, Jeannette; Freeman, Michele; Fu, Rongwei (Rochelle); O'Neil, Maya; Motu'apuaka, Makalapua; Kansagara, Devan.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 95, No. 1, 2014, p. 3-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Quinones, Ana ; Richardson, Jeannette ; Freeman, Michele ; Fu, Rongwei (Rochelle) ; O'Neil, Maya ; Motu'apuaka, Makalapua ; Kansagara, Devan. / Educational group visits for the management of chronic health conditions : A systematic review. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2014 ; Vol. 95, No. 1. pp. 3-29.
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