Educational epidemiology: Applying population-based design and analytic approaches to study medical education

Patricia A. Carney, David W. Nierenberg, Catherine F. Pipas, W. Blair Brooks, Therese A. Stukel, Adam M. Keller

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

102 Scopus citations

Abstract

Conducting educational research in medical schools is challenging partly because interventional controlled research designs are difficult to apply. In addition, strict accreditation requirements and student/faculty concerns about educational inequality reduce the flexibility needed to plan and execute educational experiments. Consequently, there is a paucity of rigorous and generalizable educational research to provide an evidence-guided foundation to support educational effectiveness. "Educational epidemiology," ie, the application across the physician education continuum of observational designs (eg, cross-sectional, longitudinal, cohort, and case-control studies) and randomized experimental designs (eg, randomized controlled trials, randomized crossover designs), could revolutionize the conduct of research in medical education. Furthermore, the creation of a comprehensive national network of educational epidemiologists could enhance collaboration and the development of a strong educational research foundation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1044-1050
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume292
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Educational epidemiology: Applying population-based design and analytic approaches to study medical education'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this