Economic and humanistic burden of post-trauma and post-surgical neuropathic pain among adults in the United States

Bruce Parsons, Caroline Schaefer, Rachael Mann, Alesia Sadosky, Shoshana Daniel, Srinivas Nalamachu, Brett R. Stacey, Edward C. Nieshoff, Michael Tuchman, Alan Anschel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Neuropathic pain (NeP) can be chronic, debilitating, and can interfere with sleep, functioning, and emotional well being. While there are multiple causes of NeP, few studies have examined the disease burden and treatment patterns associated with post-traumatic/post-surgical (PTPS) NeP. Objective: To characterize pain, health status, function, health care resource utilization, lost productivity, and costs among subjects with PTPS NeP in the United States. Methods: This observational study enrolled 100 PTPS NeP subjects recruited during routine visits from general practitioner and specialist sites. Subjects completed a one-time questionnaire with validated measures of pain severity and pain interference, health status, sleep, anxiety and depression, productivity, and study-specific items on demographics, employment status, and out-of-pocket expenses. Investigators completed a case report form based on a 6-month retrospective chart review, recording subjects' clinical characteristics as well as current and previous medications/treatments for NeP. Subjects were stratified into mild, moderate, and severe pain groups. Results: Subjects' demographic characteristics were: mean age of 54.9 years, 53% female, and 22% employed for pay. Mean pain severity score was 5.6 (0-10 scale), with 48% and 35% classified as having moderate and severe pain, respectively. The mean number of comorbidities increased with greater pain severity (P = 0.0009). Patient-reported outcomes were worse among PTPS NeP subjects with more severe pain, including pain interference with function, health state utility, sleep, and depression (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-469
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Pain Research
Volume6
StatePublished - 2013

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Neuralgia
Economics
Pain
Wounds and Injuries
Sleep
Health Status
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Demography
Depression
Health Resources
Health Expenditures
General Practitioners
Observational Studies
Comorbidity
Anxiety
Research Personnel
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Costs
  • Neuropathic pain
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Productivity
  • Quality-of-life
  • Trauma/surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Parsons, B., Schaefer, C., Mann, R., Sadosky, A., Daniel, S., Nalamachu, S., ... Anschel, A. (2013). Economic and humanistic burden of post-trauma and post-surgical neuropathic pain among adults in the United States. Journal of Pain Research, 6, 459-469.

Economic and humanistic burden of post-trauma and post-surgical neuropathic pain among adults in the United States. / Parsons, Bruce; Schaefer, Caroline; Mann, Rachael; Sadosky, Alesia; Daniel, Shoshana; Nalamachu, Srinivas; Stacey, Brett R.; Nieshoff, Edward C.; Tuchman, Michael; Anschel, Alan.

In: Journal of Pain Research, Vol. 6, 2013, p. 459-469.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Parsons, B, Schaefer, C, Mann, R, Sadosky, A, Daniel, S, Nalamachu, S, Stacey, BR, Nieshoff, EC, Tuchman, M & Anschel, A 2013, 'Economic and humanistic burden of post-trauma and post-surgical neuropathic pain among adults in the United States', Journal of Pain Research, vol. 6, pp. 459-469.
Parsons, Bruce ; Schaefer, Caroline ; Mann, Rachael ; Sadosky, Alesia ; Daniel, Shoshana ; Nalamachu, Srinivas ; Stacey, Brett R. ; Nieshoff, Edward C. ; Tuchman, Michael ; Anschel, Alan. / Economic and humanistic burden of post-trauma and post-surgical neuropathic pain among adults in the United States. In: Journal of Pain Research. 2013 ; Vol. 6. pp. 459-469.
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